A Multilevel Model of Social Capital and Adequacy of Support for Families of Children With Special Needs in Six Midwest Communities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160228
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Multilevel Model of Social Capital and Adequacy of Support for Families of Children With Special Needs in Six Midwest Communities
Abstract:
A Multilevel Model of Social Capital and Adequacy of Support for Families of Children With Special Needs in Six Midwest Communities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Looman, Wendy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Contact Address:SON 5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
BACKGROUND: Social capital, defined as investment in relationships, is a health-related asset that yields benefits to families over time through investments in relationships among families and communities. Unique family and community characteristics may play a significant role on the mechanisms of social capital and family support. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether family-level and community-level factors may influence the relationship between social capital and adequacy of support for families of children with special needs. METHODS: Survey respondents were recruited by invitations sent to parents of children who qualified for special education within six Midwestern school districts in two states. Surveys were mailed to 267 families; 251 of these returned surveys for this analysis. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) was used to calculate a regression model for each community to model the relationships among family social capital, the level of federal funding per person in the community, and adequacy of support (operationalized as the discrepancy between Help Needed and Help Received by the family in the past 6 months) while controlling for families' socioeconomic status, community population density and mean household income. RESULTS: The relationship between a family's social capital and the adequacy of support differs significantly by community, and is dependent on the amount of federal funding a community receives. CONCLUSION: Communities with higher levels of federal funding per person may represent a social contextual asset for families of children with special needs. While family-level interventions to increase social capital are important, results of this study suggest that community-level factors may benefit especially those families who have lower social capital and high levels of support needs. This is significant for nurses as well as policymakers, since it suggests that interventions at the community level may have important implications for families of children with special health care needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Multilevel Model of Social Capital and Adequacy of Support for Families of Children With Special Needs in Six Midwest Communitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160228-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Multilevel Model of Social Capital and Adequacy of Support for Families of Children With Special Needs in Six Midwest Communities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Looman, Wendy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON 5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">looma003@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Social capital, defined as investment in relationships, is a health-related asset that yields benefits to families over time through investments in relationships among families and communities. Unique family and community characteristics may play a significant role on the mechanisms of social capital and family support. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether family-level and community-level factors may influence the relationship between social capital and adequacy of support for families of children with special needs. METHODS: Survey respondents were recruited by invitations sent to parents of children who qualified for special education within six Midwestern school districts in two states. Surveys were mailed to 267 families; 251 of these returned surveys for this analysis. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) was used to calculate a regression model for each community to model the relationships among family social capital, the level of federal funding per person in the community, and adequacy of support (operationalized as the discrepancy between Help Needed and Help Received by the family in the past 6 months) while controlling for families' socioeconomic status, community population density and mean household income. RESULTS: The relationship between a family's social capital and the adequacy of support differs significantly by community, and is dependent on the amount of federal funding a community receives. CONCLUSION: Communities with higher levels of federal funding per person may represent a social contextual asset for families of children with special needs. While family-level interventions to increase social capital are important, results of this study suggest that community-level factors may benefit especially those families who have lower social capital and high levels of support needs. This is significant for nurses as well as policymakers, since it suggests that interventions at the community level may have important implications for families of children with special health care needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:44:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:44:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.