2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160229
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Optimal Childbearing Outcomes Using Evidence Based Care in Second Stage
Abstract:
Promoting Optimal Childbearing Outcomes Using Evidence Based Care in Second Stage
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Low, Lisa, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:Rm 3249, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Co-Authors:J.M. Miller and C. Sampselle, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
The use of evidence based care during childbirth is a challenge in many maternity settings. Some traditional practices like sustained breath holding in 2nd stage have remained recalcitrant to evidence based, self directed physiological management. This study explored the potential benefit of using an evidence based practice like self directed pushing compared to routine care with sustained breath holding on promoting optimal outcomes during childbirth as measured by the Optimality Index (OI-US). The OI-US is an instrument that links processes of care, grounded in scientific evidence with health outcomes to measure whether are not the entirety of care was optimal. For the purpose of the OI-US optimal care focuses on the best possible evidence based care practice or the best possible health outcome in the context of maternity care. Sample: An existing sample of 171 primaparous healthy adult women recruited for a parent study in which they were randomly assigned to either a spontaneous (N=85) treatment group or routine care (N=86) control pushing group. Methods: A secondary analysis was performed using chart abstraction to obtain the OI-US items. The OI-US score is comprised of 54 items, each coded as a dichotomous item that is either "optimal" or "not optimal." Items documented as optimal receive a score of one and not optimal a score of 0. A summed total score is constructed which is then presented as a proportion of items coded optimal compared to the potential number of possible items to code. A Student's t test analysis was performed comparing total OI-US scores between treatment and control groups. Results: The total OI-US score for the treatment group was 81.9% (SD .086) and the control group was 82.8% (SD .075). There was no statistical difference between the groups (p=.528). Conclusion: In this example of a single evidence based practice, significant differences in overall health outcomes as measured by the OI-US could not be demonstrated. It may be that there are other selected single evidence based practices that might demonstrate a significant impact. Alternatively, it may be that it is the combination of evidence based practices that are essential to improving health outcomes for mothers and babies to their optimal level. NIH#2 R01NR04007
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Optimal Childbearing Outcomes Using Evidence Based Care in Second Stageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160229-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Promoting Optimal Childbearing Outcomes Using Evidence Based Care in Second Stage</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Low, Lisa, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Rm 3249, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kanelow@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.M. Miller and C. Sampselle, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The use of evidence based care during childbirth is a challenge in many maternity settings. Some traditional practices like sustained breath holding in 2nd stage have remained recalcitrant to evidence based, self directed physiological management. This study explored the potential benefit of using an evidence based practice like self directed pushing compared to routine care with sustained breath holding on promoting optimal outcomes during childbirth as measured by the Optimality Index (OI-US). The OI-US is an instrument that links processes of care, grounded in scientific evidence with health outcomes to measure whether are not the entirety of care was optimal. For the purpose of the OI-US optimal care focuses on the best possible evidence based care practice or the best possible health outcome in the context of maternity care. Sample: An existing sample of 171 primaparous healthy adult women recruited for a parent study in which they were randomly assigned to either a spontaneous (N=85) treatment group or routine care (N=86) control pushing group. Methods: A secondary analysis was performed using chart abstraction to obtain the OI-US items. The OI-US score is comprised of 54 items, each coded as a dichotomous item that is either &quot;optimal&quot; or &quot;not optimal.&quot; Items documented as optimal receive a score of one and not optimal a score of 0. A summed total score is constructed which is then presented as a proportion of items coded optimal compared to the potential number of possible items to code. A Student's t test analysis was performed comparing total OI-US scores between treatment and control groups. Results: The total OI-US score for the treatment group was 81.9% (SD .086) and the control group was 82.8% (SD .075). There was no statistical difference between the groups (p=.528). Conclusion: In this example of a single evidence based practice, significant differences in overall health outcomes as measured by the OI-US could not be demonstrated. It may be that there are other selected single evidence based practices that might demonstrate a significant impact. Alternatively, it may be that it is the combination of evidence based practices that are essential to improving health outcomes for mothers and babies to their optimal level. NIH#2 R01NR04007</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:44:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:44:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.