Glycemic Control and Physical Activity in Diabetic Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients After a Recovery Management Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160232
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Glycemic Control and Physical Activity in Diabetic Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients After a Recovery Management Intervention
Abstract:
Glycemic Control and Physical Activity in Diabetic Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients After a Recovery Management Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Miller, Connie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 98198-5330, USA
Co-Authors:L. Zimmerman, S. Barnason, and J. Nieveen, College of Nursing-Lincoln Division, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE
Lack of glycemic control in diabetic patients after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a significant clinical problem. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the impact of a recovery management intervention on glycemic control and physical activity after CABG surgery in a group of patients with diabetes at baseline (prior to hospital discharge), 2 and 6 weeks, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Methods: A repeated measures experimental design was used and patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n=24) or a control group (n=25). The 6-week telehealth intervention delivered daily sessions via the Health Buddy« that contained diabetes management strategies and dialogue supporting recommended increases in physical activity. Outcome measures were hemoglobin A1c and data from a 3-day activity diary and RT3 accelerometer. Results: Statistical significance was not expected in this underpowered study and effect sizes for outcome variables were small to medium. Descriptively the mean HbA1c for the intervention group decreased from 7.4% (baseline) to 6.8% (3 months) as compared to the control group decrease from 7.5% (baseline) to 7% (3 months). The intervention group sustained a HbA1c of 7.0% at 6, 9, and 12 months, as compared to an increase to 7.7% by 12 months in the control group. Average kilocalories/kilogram/day (RT3 data) decreased in the intervention group between baseline (28 kilocalories) and 12 months (25 kilocalories) and increased only slightly in the control group during that time (26 to 27 kilocalories). In contrast, the intervention group reported a mean increase of 67 minutes in minutes spent in moderate, hard, and very hard activity between baseline and 12 months (activity diary) and the control group reported a 30-minute increase. Conclusions: This sample tended to over-report physical activity that was not substantiated by RT3 accelerometer data. A more prescriptive physical activity intervention to achieve desired outcomes of tighter glycemic control and a sustained increase in physical activity is needed in this high-risk population. Delivery of the intervention via a telehealth modality shows potential. It is imperative that sensitive measures of physical activity are identified for this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlycemic Control and Physical Activity in Diabetic Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients After a Recovery Management Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160232-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Glycemic Control and Physical Activity in Diabetic Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients After a Recovery Management Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Connie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 98198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">clmiller@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L. Zimmerman, S. Barnason, and J. Nieveen, College of Nursing-Lincoln Division, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Lack of glycemic control in diabetic patients after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a significant clinical problem. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the impact of a recovery management intervention on glycemic control and physical activity after CABG surgery in a group of patients with diabetes at baseline (prior to hospital discharge), 2 and 6 weeks, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Methods: A repeated measures experimental design was used and patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n=24) or a control group (n=25). The 6-week telehealth intervention delivered daily sessions via the Health Buddy&laquo; that contained diabetes management strategies and dialogue supporting recommended increases in physical activity. Outcome measures were hemoglobin A1c and data from a 3-day activity diary and RT3 accelerometer. Results: Statistical significance was not expected in this underpowered study and effect sizes for outcome variables were small to medium. Descriptively the mean HbA1c for the intervention group decreased from 7.4% (baseline) to 6.8% (3 months) as compared to the control group decrease from 7.5% (baseline) to 7% (3 months). The intervention group sustained a HbA1c of 7.0% at 6, 9, and 12 months, as compared to an increase to 7.7% by 12 months in the control group. Average kilocalories/kilogram/day (RT3 data) decreased in the intervention group between baseline (28 kilocalories) and 12 months (25 kilocalories) and increased only slightly in the control group during that time (26 to 27 kilocalories). In contrast, the intervention group reported a mean increase of 67 minutes in minutes spent in moderate, hard, and very hard activity between baseline and 12 months (activity diary) and the control group reported a 30-minute increase. Conclusions: This sample tended to over-report physical activity that was not substantiated by RT3 accelerometer data. A more prescriptive physical activity intervention to achieve desired outcomes of tighter glycemic control and a sustained increase in physical activity is needed in this high-risk population. Delivery of the intervention via a telehealth modality shows potential. It is imperative that sensitive measures of physical activity are identified for this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:44:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:44:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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