The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Urine Volume Rhythms in Rats of Different Ages

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160237
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Urine Volume Rhythms in Rats of Different Ages
Abstract:
The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Urine Volume Rhythms in Rats of Different Ages
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Chaperon, Claudia, MSN, RN,C-GNP
Contact Address:CON, 600 South 42nd Street, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Co-Authors:Lynne A. Farr, PhD, Professor
Nocturia is an important problem in older adults. Changes in circadian physiologic rhythms and loss of sleep, common in the elderly, may explain the shift of urine volume rhythms from daytime to nighttime in persons of advanced age. This hypothesis is suggested by Borbely’s two-phase model of sleep regulation which provides the conceptual framework for this study. A sleep deprivation protocol is being used to investigate relationships among the key rhythms and the internal regulation system. In the pilot experiment, rats (11 to 26 months) were exposed to three different conditions consecutively for a total of 84 data collection days. Seven baseline days of 12:12 light/dark (LD) cycle was measured first followed by 7 days of continuous dim light (LL), and by 7 days of LL during which rats were prevented from sleeping (LLSD). LL conditions removed alternating circadian cues and then sleep deprivation was added. Core temperature, locomotor activity, urine excretion volume, urine sodium concentration, and urine osmolality were measured continuously. Data were analyzed for circadian rhythms and changes in rhythmicity between the 3 periods. Preliminary results suggest that the urine volume rhythm peaked later during LLSD conditions. Temperature rhythms delayed (F=9.507, p<0.001, $=0.976) and activity rhythms also occurred later (F=5.986, p <0.003, $=0.821). Analysis of urine sodium concentration and urine osmolality is still pending. These preliminary results indicated that environmental cues and sleep deprivation shifted urine volume rhythms away from the preferred timing and that age increased the severity of these effects. Supported by NASA Nebraska Space Grant 4005.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Urine Volume Rhythms in Rats of Different Agesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160237-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Urine Volume Rhythms in Rats of Different Ages</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chaperon, Claudia, MSN, RN,C-GNP</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 600 South 42nd Street, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynne A. Farr, PhD, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nocturia is an important problem in older adults. Changes in circadian physiologic rhythms and loss of sleep, common in the elderly, may explain the shift of urine volume rhythms from daytime to nighttime in persons of advanced age. This hypothesis is suggested by Borbely&rsquo;s two-phase model of sleep regulation which provides the conceptual framework for this study. A sleep deprivation protocol is being used to investigate relationships among the key rhythms and the internal regulation system. In the pilot experiment, rats (11 to 26 months) were exposed to three different conditions consecutively for a total of 84 data collection days. Seven baseline days of 12:12 light/dark (LD) cycle was measured first followed by 7 days of continuous dim light (LL), and by 7 days of LL during which rats were prevented from sleeping (LLSD). LL conditions removed alternating circadian cues and then sleep deprivation was added. Core temperature, locomotor activity, urine excretion volume, urine sodium concentration, and urine osmolality were measured continuously. Data were analyzed for circadian rhythms and changes in rhythmicity between the 3 periods. Preliminary results suggest that the urine volume rhythm peaked later during LLSD conditions. Temperature rhythms delayed (F=9.507, p&lt;0.001, $=0.976) and activity rhythms also occurred later (F=5.986, p &lt;0.003, $=0.821). Analysis of urine sodium concentration and urine osmolality is still pending. These preliminary results indicated that environmental cues and sleep deprivation shifted urine volume rhythms away from the preferred timing and that age increased the severity of these effects. Supported by NASA Nebraska Space Grant 4005.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:45:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:45:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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