A Natural Environment Intervention Restores Attention in Women Treated for Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160241
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Natural Environment Intervention Restores Attention in Women Treated for Breast Cancer
Abstract:
A Natural Environment Intervention Restores Attention in Women Treated for Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Cimprich, Bernadine, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 400 North Ingalls - Room 2172, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Co-Authors:David L. Ronis, PhD
A decline in the capacity to direct attention (CDA) may occur in women treated for breast cancer. Theoretically, the decline in CDA may be due to attentional fatigue in response to intense mental demands related to diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. A theoretically based cognitive intervention is hypothesized to counteract attentional fatigue through exposure to natural environment. The primary study objective was to determine whether a natural environmental intervention initiated before surgery could improve CDA over time. Data were obtained from 78 participants (M age=54) with early stage breast cancer using a battery of measures of the capacity to direct attention (CDA) at five time points: pre-surgery, and again at two weeks, and three, six and 10 months after surgery. A randomly assigned intervention protocol was initiated after the first assessment, consisting of a home-based program of 120 minutes per week of exposure to the natural environment. Many participants showed a lowered CDA before surgery (Time 1). Repeated measures ANOVA using a standardized total attention score (TAS) at five time points indicated a significant intervention group by time interaction effect, F (4, 76)=2.80, p=.026. The pattern of changes indicated that the intervention group (n=40) showed a gain of 1.7 units in TAS from Time 1 to Time 5; in contrast, the non-intervention group (n=38) showed initial gains followed by a loss at Time 5 and an overall gain of 0.62 units from Time 1 to Time 5. Participants randomly assigned to the natural environmental intervention group showed a sustained recovery of attention over time. These findings suggest long-term therapeutic benefits from early intervention aimed at restoring attention in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Supported by NINR-R29NR04132
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Natural Environment Intervention Restores Attention in Women Treated for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160241-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Natural Environment Intervention Restores Attention in Women Treated for Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cimprich, Bernadine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 400 North Ingalls - Room 2172, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">David L. Ronis, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A decline in the capacity to direct attention (CDA) may occur in women treated for breast cancer. Theoretically, the decline in CDA may be due to attentional fatigue in response to intense mental demands related to diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. A theoretically based cognitive intervention is hypothesized to counteract attentional fatigue through exposure to natural environment. The primary study objective was to determine whether a natural environmental intervention initiated before surgery could improve CDA over time. Data were obtained from 78 participants (M age=54) with early stage breast cancer using a battery of measures of the capacity to direct attention (CDA) at five time points: pre-surgery, and again at two weeks, and three, six and 10 months after surgery. A randomly assigned intervention protocol was initiated after the first assessment, consisting of a home-based program of 120 minutes per week of exposure to the natural environment. Many participants showed a lowered CDA before surgery (Time 1). Repeated measures ANOVA using a standardized total attention score (TAS) at five time points indicated a significant intervention group by time interaction effect, F (4, 76)=2.80, p=.026. The pattern of changes indicated that the intervention group (n=40) showed a gain of 1.7 units in TAS from Time 1 to Time 5; in contrast, the non-intervention group (n=38) showed initial gains followed by a loss at Time 5 and an overall gain of 0.62 units from Time 1 to Time 5. Participants randomly assigned to the natural environmental intervention group showed a sustained recovery of attention over time. These findings suggest long-term therapeutic benefits from early intervention aimed at restoring attention in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Supported by NINR-R29NR04132 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:45:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:45:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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