2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160243
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Consistent Condom Use Among Low-Income African American Women
Abstract:
Predictors of Consistent Condom Use Among Low-Income African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Dancy, Barbara, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:PMA #1060 -m/c 802, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL, 60612-7350 , USA
The purpose was to determine which variables predicted reported consistent condom use over time for a sample of 280 low-income African American women. The variables of interest were knowledge of HIV transmission, self-efficacy for low-risk HIV behavior, perceived HIV vulnerability, social norms related to male-female relationships, attitudes related to condom use, and HIV community behavior related to promoting their community’s awareness about HIV among African Americans. A longitudinal cross-over research design with extended posttest observations was used where during phase 1, one of two geographically separated but environmentally and demographically similar communities was randomly assigned to receive the HIV prevention curriculum and the other community received the health promotion curriculum. In phase 1, after pretesting, women received the designated curriculum and were post tested at 3, 6, and 9 months. After the ninth month post test, the curriculum was switched in phase 2 so that those women who initially received the HIV prevention curriculum in phase 1 now received the health promotion curriculum and those who received the health promotion curriculum now received the HIV prevention curriculum. The women mean age was 31 years (SD=7.6). The women didn’t differ significantly on any pretest or demographic variables. The research was guided by an integration of Bandura’s self-efficacy, Fishbein and Ajzen’s perception of social norms and attitude about the proposed behavior, and Janz and Becker’s perceived vulnerability for a proposed illness. Using SAS macro GLIMMIX, the data revealed that self-efficacy for low-risk HIV behavior, HIV community behavior, and social norms related to male-female relationships predicted consistent condom use over time. These three variables accounted for 49% of the variance. It is concluded that to enhance consistent condom use overtime it may be beneficial to promote and reinforce these variables.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Consistent Condom Use Among Low-Income African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160243-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Consistent Condom Use Among Low-Income African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dancy, Barbara, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PMA #1060 -m/c 802, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL, 60612-7350 , USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose was to determine which variables predicted reported consistent condom use over time for a sample of 280 low-income African American women. The variables of interest were knowledge of HIV transmission, self-efficacy for low-risk HIV behavior, perceived HIV vulnerability, social norms related to male-female relationships, attitudes related to condom use, and HIV community behavior related to promoting their community&rsquo;s awareness about HIV among African Americans. A longitudinal cross-over research design with extended posttest observations was used where during phase 1, one of two geographically separated but environmentally and demographically similar communities was randomly assigned to receive the HIV prevention curriculum and the other community received the health promotion curriculum. In phase 1, after pretesting, women received the designated curriculum and were post tested at 3, 6, and 9 months. After the ninth month post test, the curriculum was switched in phase 2 so that those women who initially received the HIV prevention curriculum in phase 1 now received the health promotion curriculum and those who received the health promotion curriculum now received the HIV prevention curriculum. The women mean age was 31 years (SD=7.6). The women didn&rsquo;t differ significantly on any pretest or demographic variables. The research was guided by an integration of Bandura&rsquo;s self-efficacy, Fishbein and Ajzen&rsquo;s perception of social norms and attitude about the proposed behavior, and Janz and Becker&rsquo;s perceived vulnerability for a proposed illness. Using SAS macro GLIMMIX, the data revealed that self-efficacy for low-risk HIV behavior, HIV community behavior, and social norms related to male-female relationships predicted consistent condom use over time. These three variables accounted for 49% of the variance. It is concluded that to enhance consistent condom use overtime it may be beneficial to promote and reinforce these variables.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:45:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:45:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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