2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160244
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Antecedents Related to Cardiac Arrest in General Medical Unit Patients
Abstract:
Clinical Antecedents Related to Cardiac Arrest in General Medical Unit Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Davis, Alice, PhD, RN,
Contact Address:Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Co-Authors:Louise Grondin, MS, RN, Rachael Ball, MS, RN; April Ballard, MS, RN, Stephanie Johnson, MS, RN; Brady West
The in-hospital mortality rate following cardiopulmonary arrest on general medical units (GMUs) is dangerously high. It is believed that GMU patients would benefit from earlier identification of possible common clinical antecedents to cardiac arrests (CA). Yet, only a handful of clinical antecedents to CAs have been identified. The specific aim of this project was to identify common demographic and clinical characteristics in GMU patients who experienced a CA. The medical records of 45 CA patients were retrospectively reviewed for demographic and clinical similarities using the Risk Index Tool. Data were collected the day of the CA and the three days prior to CA. Mortality was over 80%. A significant linear association was found between increasing respiratory rate (RR) and time before arrest. The RR increased steadily over the days prior to arrest from 16.1% to 41.7% (gamma=-0311, p <0.05). There was a significant association between a diagnosis of respiratory difficulty and a complaint of shortness of breath (SOB) at admission (Fisher’s Exact Test p < 0.05). A significant linear association was found between change in mental status and the time before arrest (gamma=-0.336, p < 0.01). Change in mental status increased significantly over the days leading to CA with more than 50% of patients having a change in mental status on the day of arrest. In this study CA was associated with changes in clinical signs and symptoms days prior to the arrest suggesting CA was not an unpredictable event. These important antecedent (respiratory and mental status) patterns can not be ignored, as they provide clear evidence of CA vulnerability in GMU patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Antecedents Related to Cardiac Arrest in General Medical Unit Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160244-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical Antecedents Related to Cardiac Arrest in General Medical Unit Patients </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Alice, PhD, RN,</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Louise Grondin, MS, RN, Rachael Ball, MS, RN; April Ballard, MS, RN, Stephanie Johnson, MS, RN; Brady West </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The in-hospital mortality rate following cardiopulmonary arrest on general medical units (GMUs) is dangerously high. It is believed that GMU patients would benefit from earlier identification of possible common clinical antecedents to cardiac arrests (CA). Yet, only a handful of clinical antecedents to CAs have been identified. The specific aim of this project was to identify common demographic and clinical characteristics in GMU patients who experienced a CA. The medical records of 45 CA patients were retrospectively reviewed for demographic and clinical similarities using the Risk Index Tool. Data were collected the day of the CA and the three days prior to CA. Mortality was over 80%. A significant linear association was found between increasing respiratory rate (RR) and time before arrest. The RR increased steadily over the days prior to arrest from 16.1% to 41.7% (gamma=-0311, p &lt;0.05). There was a significant association between a diagnosis of respiratory difficulty and a complaint of shortness of breath (SOB) at admission (Fisher&rsquo;s Exact Test p &lt; 0.05). A significant linear association was found between change in mental status and the time before arrest (gamma=-0.336, p &lt; 0.01). Change in mental status increased significantly over the days leading to CA with more than 50% of patients having a change in mental status on the day of arrest. In this study CA was associated with changes in clinical signs and symptoms days prior to the arrest suggesting CA was not an unpredictable event. These important antecedent (respiratory and mental status) patterns can not be ignored, as they provide clear evidence of CA vulnerability in GMU patients. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:45:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:45:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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