2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160252
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Related to Overcrowding in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Factors Related to Overcrowding in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Haddad, Heather, BSN
Contact Address:CON, 111 Newton Hall,, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210-1289, USA
Co-Authors:Nancy Ryan-Wenger, PhD, RN, Professor; Associate Dean for Research
Overcrowding in Emergency Departments (ED) is a major barrier to patients receiving timely care. While the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations has proposed new standards to address the issue of overcrowding in the ED, few scientific studies have documented the problem. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time required to move patients through the ED to an inpatient unit. Methods: The time elapsed between four events was monitored: 1) decision to admit by ED physician - arrival of inpatient attending physician; 2) arrival of attending physician – admission orders completed; 3) orders completed – report called to nursing station; and 4) report called – transfer of patient. Sample: Over a 5-month period, 100 ED patients from a large community hospital were observed; 74% day shift (6A – 6P) and 26% night shift (6P – 6A). Results: Admission bed type included 27% regular, 64% telemetry, and 9% intensive care. The average total amount of time that elapsed from the decision to admit a patient to transfer of the patient to the unit was 163 minutes (range: 38 – 370). ANOVA showed that bed type made no difference in elapsed time. The night shift required significantly greater total wait time (p=.023), time between completion of admission orders and report called (p=.001), and report called and transfer of patient to the unit (p=.039). Conclusions: The most significant delays are in the purview of nursing practice: nurses call the inpatient units with admission orders, and arrange for transfer of patients to the units. Nevertheless, the range of patients’ total wait time, during which their new orders may not be implemented was from ½ to 6.2 hours. Further research is warranted to determine the underlying causes of this wait time.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Related to Overcrowding in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160252-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Related to Overcrowding in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Haddad, Heather, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 111 Newton Hall,, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210-1289, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Ryan-Wenger, PhD, RN, Professor; Associate Dean for Research </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Overcrowding in Emergency Departments (ED) is a major barrier to patients receiving timely care. While the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations has proposed new standards to address the issue of overcrowding in the ED, few scientific studies have documented the problem. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time required to move patients through the ED to an inpatient unit. Methods: The time elapsed between four events was monitored: 1) decision to admit by ED physician - arrival of inpatient attending physician; 2) arrival of attending physician &ndash; admission orders completed; 3) orders completed &ndash; report called to nursing station; and 4) report called &ndash; transfer of patient. Sample: Over a 5-month period, 100 ED patients from a large community hospital were observed; 74% day shift (6A &ndash; 6P) and 26% night shift (6P &ndash; 6A). Results: Admission bed type included 27% regular, 64% telemetry, and 9% intensive care. The average total amount of time that elapsed from the decision to admit a patient to transfer of the patient to the unit was 163 minutes (range: 38 &ndash; 370). ANOVA showed that bed type made no difference in elapsed time. The night shift required significantly greater total wait time (p=.023), time between completion of admission orders and report called (p=.001), and report called and transfer of patient to the unit (p=.039). Conclusions: The most significant delays are in the purview of nursing practice: nurses call the inpatient units with admission orders, and arrange for transfer of patients to the units. Nevertheless, the range of patients&rsquo; total wait time, during which their new orders may not be implemented was from &frac12; to 6.2 hours. Further research is warranted to determine the underlying causes of this wait time. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:46:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:46:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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