2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160254
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Care Activities Reported by Older Adults in Congregate Housing
Abstract:
Self-Care Activities Reported by Older Adults in Congregate Housing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Hertz, Judith, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 42 Evergreen Drive, Streamwood, IL, 60107, USA
Co-Authors:Catherine M. Nelson, MS, RN, Geriatric Resource Nurse
The purpose of this investigation, part of a larger triangulated pilot study, was to delineate the types of self-care activities reported by older adults who live in congregate housing. Understanding the activities that older persons actually use is needed so that nurses can assist them to maintain and improve their health. Theoretical Framework: The self-care model from Modeling and Role-Modeling nursing theory (Erickson, Tomlin, & Swain, 1988) provided the framework for the study. In this theory, self-care has three aspects. Self-care knowledge is that at some level each person knows what will promote personal growth and health. Self-care resources are interdependent with self-care knowledge, and are external and internal. Self-care actions are unique for each person and incorporate mobilizing self-care knowledge and resources to influence one’s health. Participants: Four persons, three women and one man, over age 65 who lived in an apartment building for seniors were randomly selected for the interview from all persons who had completed written self-report questionnaires. Methods: Part of a semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit respondents’ perceptions regarding their self-care activities. The 45-minute, tape-recorded interview was conducted in each respondent’s apartment and then transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using traditional thematic analysis (Miles & Huberman, 1994). Results: Three themes emerged; themes represented types of self-care activities used by respondents to influence their health. The themes were: (a) holistic health promotion and prevention activities, (b) affiliated-individuation activities, and (c) activities to meet generativity needs. Conclusions: These findings provide a schema for describing older adults’ self-care activities and have implications for health promotion in this population. Implications for theory development and directions for future research will also be discussed. This study was funded by a grant from Beta Omega Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Care Activities Reported by Older Adults in Congregate Housingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160254-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Care Activities Reported by Older Adults in Congregate Housing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hertz, Judith, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 42 Evergreen Drive, Streamwood, IL, 60107, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Catherine M. Nelson, MS, RN, Geriatric Resource Nurse </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this investigation, part of a larger triangulated pilot study, was to delineate the types of self-care activities reported by older adults who live in congregate housing. Understanding the activities that older persons actually use is needed so that nurses can assist them to maintain and improve their health. Theoretical Framework: The self-care model from Modeling and Role-Modeling nursing theory (Erickson, Tomlin, &amp; Swain, 1988) provided the framework for the study. In this theory, self-care has three aspects. Self-care knowledge is that at some level each person knows what will promote personal growth and health. Self-care resources are interdependent with self-care knowledge, and are external and internal. Self-care actions are unique for each person and incorporate mobilizing self-care knowledge and resources to influence one&rsquo;s health. Participants: Four persons, three women and one man, over age 65 who lived in an apartment building for seniors were randomly selected for the interview from all persons who had completed written self-report questionnaires. Methods: Part of a semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit respondents&rsquo; perceptions regarding their self-care activities. The 45-minute, tape-recorded interview was conducted in each respondent&rsquo;s apartment and then transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using traditional thematic analysis (Miles &amp; Huberman, 1994). Results: Three themes emerged; themes represented types of self-care activities used by respondents to influence their health. The themes were: (a) holistic health promotion and prevention activities, (b) affiliated-individuation activities, and (c) activities to meet generativity needs. Conclusions: These findings provide a schema for describing older adults&rsquo; self-care activities and have implications for health promotion in this population. Implications for theory development and directions for future research will also be discussed. This study was funded by a grant from Beta Omega Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:46:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:46:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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