2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160255
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prospective Validation of a Discharge Planning Screen
Abstract:
Prospective Validation of a Discharge Planning Screen
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Holland, Diane, MS, RN
Title:Research Specialist
Contact Address:Nursing Research Division, Eisenberg SL 41, 201 West Center Street, Rochester, MN, 55902, USA
Co-Authors:Cynthia L. Leibson, PhD; V. Shane Pankratz, PhD, Senior Research Associate; Kathleen Krichbaum, RN, PhD, Associate Professor; Marcelline R. Harris, RN, PhD
Millions of people are discharged from hospitals each year, yet there are no generally accepted, empirically derived tools that facilitate the process of identifying, assessing, and planning for meeting continuing care needs of patients following discharge. Absent a valid and reliable tool to facilitate the allocation of specialized hospital discharge planning resources (discharge planning RNs and social workers), patients may experience disparities in the access to and use of post hospital care services. A previous study identified four variables (age, prior living status, dependence, and self-reported walking limitation) that predicted use of specialized hospital discharge planning services. The purpose of this study was to prospectively validate the screen performance. An observational cohort of 303 hospitalized adults was assembled from 2 hospitals within a large Midwestern, tertiary care, referral-based system and followed from admission through discharge. The variables in the screen were collected within 48 hours of admission by chart review. Use of specialized hospital discharge planning resources was determined by chart review at discharge. Possible screen scores range from 0 to 23 with a cut-point score of 10 based on optimizing sensitivity (75%) and specificity (78%). The screen performed as well as in the study in which the screen variables were initially identified. Persons with a score of 10 and above were observed to use specialized discharge planning services at the same proportion as persons in the original study (McNemar’s Test (S)=16.3, P < 0.001). Results of this study extend previous work to develop an empirically derived discharge planning screen. Further research is planned to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the screen. One area of particular interest is motivation in health behavior and the relationship to an individual’s ability to plan for meeting their continuing care needs after hospital discharge.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProspective Validation of a Discharge Planning Screenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160255-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prospective Validation of a Discharge Planning Screen</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holland, Diane, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research Division, Eisenberg SL 41, 201 West Center Street, Rochester, MN, 55902, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia L. Leibson, PhD; V. Shane Pankratz, PhD, Senior Research Associate; Kathleen Krichbaum, RN, PhD, Associate Professor; Marcelline R. Harris, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Millions of people are discharged from hospitals each year, yet there are no generally accepted, empirically derived tools that facilitate the process of identifying, assessing, and planning for meeting continuing care needs of patients following discharge. Absent a valid and reliable tool to facilitate the allocation of specialized hospital discharge planning resources (discharge planning RNs and social workers), patients may experience disparities in the access to and use of post hospital care services. A previous study identified four variables (age, prior living status, dependence, and self-reported walking limitation) that predicted use of specialized hospital discharge planning services. The purpose of this study was to prospectively validate the screen performance. An observational cohort of 303 hospitalized adults was assembled from 2 hospitals within a large Midwestern, tertiary care, referral-based system and followed from admission through discharge. The variables in the screen were collected within 48 hours of admission by chart review. Use of specialized hospital discharge planning resources was determined by chart review at discharge. Possible screen scores range from 0 to 23 with a cut-point score of 10 based on optimizing sensitivity (75%) and specificity (78%). The screen performed as well as in the study in which the screen variables were initially identified. Persons with a score of 10 and above were observed to use specialized discharge planning services at the same proportion as persons in the original study (McNemar&rsquo;s Test (S)=16.3, P &lt; 0.001). Results of this study extend previous work to develop an empirically derived discharge planning screen. Further research is planned to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the screen. One area of particular interest is motivation in health behavior and the relationship to an individual&rsquo;s ability to plan for meeting their continuing care needs after hospital discharge.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:46:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:46:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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