The Relationship between Abnormal Electrophysiological Features and Clinical Symptoms Manifested through Onset and Progression of AD

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160256
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Abnormal Electrophysiological Features and Clinical Symptoms Manifested through Onset and Progression of AD
Abstract:
The Relationship between Abnormal Electrophysiological Features and Clinical Symptoms Manifested through Onset and Progression of AD
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Holston, Ezra, PhD, RN
Title:Post-doc Clinical Genetics Fellow
Contact Address:College of Nursing - 305 Nursing Building, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive degeneration in cognition, behavior, and daily functioning. A clinical diagnosis emerges when degeneration is objectively assessed (the mild-moderate stage of AD). An electrophysiological evaluation of brain activity will enhance the accuracy and efficiency of an early diagnosis and promote proactive nursing care. The secondary analysis' purpose was to examine the relationship between clinical symptoms and abnormal electrophysiological features. The conceptual framework included the concepts of mutual interaction and psychophysical parallelism from Berger's Psychophysical Model. Sample included 100 community residents (aged 50-89 years) ranging from normal-functioning elders to those diagnosed with severe AD. Baseline (BL) and follow-up (FU) data were extracted from two databases. Neuropsychological data included Global Deterioration Scale, Mini Mental Status Examination, Behavioral Pathology in AD Rating Scale, and Functional Assessment Staging of AD. Electrophysiological data included neurometric quantitative electroencephalogram. A moderate relationship (r=.38-.66, p £ .001) existed between abnormal electrophysiological features and clinical symptoms. A multivariate set of BL abnormal electrophysiological features explained 86% of the variance in a multivariate set of FU clinical symptoms. A predictor composed of multivariate BL abnormal electrophysiological features explained a minimum of 50% of the variance in individual FU clinical symptoms. Earliest preclinical symptoms were degeneration in daily functioning and behavior with absolute/relative delta deficit and increase in absolute/relative/mean frequency theta in frontal regions of normal-functioning elders. Theta excess in absolute power, relative power, and mean frequency was prominent in the frontal regions and progressed to the posterior regions, through early onset to severe AD. Findings suggest that the inclusion of an electrophysiological evaluation in the assessment of AD may inform nursing interventions designed to delay and prevent the progression of AD.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Abnormal Electrophysiological Features and Clinical Symptoms Manifested through Onset and Progression of ADen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160256-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship between Abnormal Electrophysiological Features and Clinical Symptoms Manifested through Onset and Progression of AD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holston, Ezra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post-doc Clinical Genetics Fellow </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing - 305 Nursing Building, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive degeneration in cognition, behavior, and daily functioning. A clinical diagnosis emerges when degeneration is objectively assessed (the mild-moderate stage of AD). An electrophysiological evaluation of brain activity will enhance the accuracy and efficiency of an early diagnosis and promote proactive nursing care. The secondary analysis' purpose was to examine the relationship between clinical symptoms and abnormal electrophysiological features. The conceptual framework included the concepts of mutual interaction and psychophysical parallelism from Berger's Psychophysical Model. Sample included 100 community residents (aged 50-89 years) ranging from normal-functioning elders to those diagnosed with severe AD. Baseline (BL) and follow-up (FU) data were extracted from two databases. Neuropsychological data included Global Deterioration Scale, Mini Mental Status Examination, Behavioral Pathology in AD Rating Scale, and Functional Assessment Staging of AD. Electrophysiological data included neurometric quantitative electroencephalogram. A moderate relationship (r=.38-.66, p &pound; .001) existed between abnormal electrophysiological features and clinical symptoms. A multivariate set of BL abnormal electrophysiological features explained 86% of the variance in a multivariate set of FU clinical symptoms. A predictor composed of multivariate BL abnormal electrophysiological features explained a minimum of 50% of the variance in individual FU clinical symptoms. Earliest preclinical symptoms were degeneration in daily functioning and behavior with absolute/relative delta deficit and increase in absolute/relative/mean frequency theta in frontal regions of normal-functioning elders. Theta excess in absolute power, relative power, and mean frequency was prominent in the frontal regions and progressed to the posterior regions, through early onset to severe AD. Findings suggest that the inclusion of an electrophysiological evaluation in the assessment of AD may inform nursing interventions designed to delay and prevent the progression of AD.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:46:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:46:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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