2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160258
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge and Beliefs about Advance Directives
Abstract:
Knowledge and Beliefs about Advance Directives
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Huckstadt, Alicia, PhD, ARNP, FNP
Title:Professor
Contact Address:SON, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS, 67260-0041, USA
Numerous studies have demonstrated that dying patients, their families, and health care professionals are inadequately prepared for this stressful event. Over a decade has elapsed since the passage of the Patient Self Determination Act that requires hospitals, nursing homes and health plans to ask whether patients have Advance Directives (ADs) and to incorporate the ADs into the medical record. Yet in one large study of seriously ill hospitalized patients (N=9105) researchers found only one in three ADs are documented in the permanent medical record by health care providers (Teno et al., 1997). Patient and family barriers to completing and using ADs are beginning to emerge. Nurses are in ideal positions to inform and support patients’ ADs. However, little is known about how much nurses know about ADs and how they perceive and value ADs. The purpose of this study was to examine the knowledge level and attitudes of nurses and undergraduate nursing students toward Advance Directives. One hundred eighty-nine subjects completed the AD Knowledge and Values survey (modified from Crego & Lipp’s “Nurses’ Knowledge of Advance Directives” & Doukas & McCullough’s “Quality of Life Values”). The framework for the study included Doukas & McCullough’s “The Value History” in which identification of values and beliefs assist individuals to assign advance directives on the basis of those values and beliefs. This process helps individuals become clear about what he or she wants and why and helps communicate these to others. A non-experimental descriptive design was used. Differences in mean scores between undergraduate nursing students and nurses will be reported. Correlational analyses of knowledge and attitudes scores with demographic and other variables such as experience with a life threatening illness will be presented. Findings may be helpful for developing effective AD educational programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge and Beliefs about Advance Directivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160258-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Knowledge and Beliefs about Advance Directives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huckstadt, Alicia, PhD, ARNP, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS, 67260-0041, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Numerous studies have demonstrated that dying patients, their families, and health care professionals are inadequately prepared for this stressful event. Over a decade has elapsed since the passage of the Patient Self Determination Act that requires hospitals, nursing homes and health plans to ask whether patients have Advance Directives (ADs) and to incorporate the ADs into the medical record. Yet in one large study of seriously ill hospitalized patients (N=9105) researchers found only one in three ADs are documented in the permanent medical record by health care providers (Teno et al., 1997). Patient and family barriers to completing and using ADs are beginning to emerge. Nurses are in ideal positions to inform and support patients&rsquo; ADs. However, little is known about how much nurses know about ADs and how they perceive and value ADs. The purpose of this study was to examine the knowledge level and attitudes of nurses and undergraduate nursing students toward Advance Directives. One hundred eighty-nine subjects completed the AD Knowledge and Values survey (modified from Crego &amp; Lipp&rsquo;s &ldquo;Nurses&rsquo; Knowledge of Advance Directives&rdquo; &amp; Doukas &amp; McCullough&rsquo;s &ldquo;Quality of Life Values&rdquo;). The framework for the study included Doukas &amp; McCullough&rsquo;s &ldquo;The Value History&rdquo; in which identification of values and beliefs assist individuals to assign advance directives on the basis of those values and beliefs. This process helps individuals become clear about what he or she wants and why and helps communicate these to others. A non-experimental descriptive design was used. Differences in mean scores between undergraduate nursing students and nurses will be reported. Correlational analyses of knowledge and attitudes scores with demographic and other variables such as experience with a life threatening illness will be presented. Findings may be helpful for developing effective AD educational programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:46:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:46:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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