2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160259
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Choice and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions For IV Insertion Pain
Abstract:
Choice and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions For IV Insertion Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Jacobson, Ann, PhD, RN
Contact Address:CON, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Cognitive-behavioral interventions (CBIs) for pain may be beneficial for high volume procedures such as IV insertion because they are safe, inexpensive, quick and easy to implement, have a high degree of patient acceptability, and can be performed independently by the nurse. Research is needed to identify the effect of commonly-used but little-tested CBIs, and to determine if allowing patients a choice of intervention influences pain of invasive procedures. This randomized, controlled study examined the effect of three CBIs and choice of intervention on pain intensity and distress associated with IV insertion in 320 adults preparing for same day surgery or endoscopy procedures. The interventions were recorded guided imagery, listening to music, and viewing a kaleidoscope. A control group received usual care. Approximately one half the subjects were randomly assigned to a treatment group; the other half choose from among the interventions or usual care. Participants rated the pain intensity and distress of the IV insertion on 11-point numeric rating scales. An 11-point measure of insertion difficulty was collected from nurses inserting the IVs to use as a control variable. Analyses of variance demonstrated no statistically significant effect of the interventions on IV insertion pain intensity or distress. Significantly more men than women chose usual care when offered a choice, with this group having the lowest mean pain scores. Pain intensity, distress, and IV insertion difficulty were significantly positively correlated. Patients expressed satisfaction with receiving the interventions. Findings support the premise that cognitive-behavioral interventions are well-liked by patients. However, they do not independently affect IV insertion pain. Additional controlled studies of CBIs effect on other invasive procedures, and in combination with other clinical environmental manipulations, are warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChoice and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions For IV Insertion Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160259-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Choice and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions For IV Insertion Pain </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jacobson, Ann, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cognitive-behavioral interventions (CBIs) for pain may be beneficial for high volume procedures such as IV insertion because they are safe, inexpensive, quick and easy to implement, have a high degree of patient acceptability, and can be performed independently by the nurse. Research is needed to identify the effect of commonly-used but little-tested CBIs, and to determine if allowing patients a choice of intervention influences pain of invasive procedures. This randomized, controlled study examined the effect of three CBIs and choice of intervention on pain intensity and distress associated with IV insertion in 320 adults preparing for same day surgery or endoscopy procedures. The interventions were recorded guided imagery, listening to music, and viewing a kaleidoscope. A control group received usual care. Approximately one half the subjects were randomly assigned to a treatment group; the other half choose from among the interventions or usual care. Participants rated the pain intensity and distress of the IV insertion on 11-point numeric rating scales. An 11-point measure of insertion difficulty was collected from nurses inserting the IVs to use as a control variable. Analyses of variance demonstrated no statistically significant effect of the interventions on IV insertion pain intensity or distress. Significantly more men than women chose usual care when offered a choice, with this group having the lowest mean pain scores. Pain intensity, distress, and IV insertion difficulty were significantly positively correlated. Patients expressed satisfaction with receiving the interventions. Findings support the premise that cognitive-behavioral interventions are well-liked by patients. However, they do not independently affect IV insertion pain. Additional controlled studies of CBIs effect on other invasive procedures, and in combination with other clinical environmental manipulations, are warranted. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:46:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:46:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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