2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160265
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers Efficacy: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Version
Abstract:
Barriers Efficacy: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Version
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Larson, Janet, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Medical Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Margaret K. Covey, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Mary K. Kapella, PhD, RN, Research Specialist
The purpose of this research was to examine the psychometric properties of the COPD version of the Barriers Efficacy scale, a measure of self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to exercise. This is a modification of McAuley’s well established Barriers Efficacy scale. We interviewed 9 people with COPD to identify common reasons that prevent them from participating in a structured exercise program. Based on the results of these interviews we retained all 12 original items and added 3 new items appropriate for people with COPD. The revised instrument was administered by mailed survey to 43 people with COPD. The relationship between barriers efficacy, functional performance and self-reported exercise time/week was examined. Functional Performance was measured with the Functional Performance Inventory (FPI), Leidy __. The mean score for the Barriers Efficacy: COPD was 53 (SD=22) with a range from 16 to 96. Internal consistency reliability was high, Cronbach’s alpha .93. Item-total correlations all exceeded .53 and most exceeded .60. There was no evidence of floor or ceiling effects. Significant correlations were observed between barriers efficacy and: total minutes of exercise a week (r=.67), Total Functional Performance Inventory (FPI) (r=.44), FPI physical exertion (r=.63), FPI recreational activity (r=.40) and age (r=.31). Age and FPI physical exertion accounted for 43% of the variance in barriers efficacy, p<.0001. Age and self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to exercise accounted for 48% of the variance in number of minutes of exercise a week. People with a higher level of function were more confident in their ability to overcome barriers to exercise and self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to exercise predicted the amount of exercise they actually performed. This is consistent with self-efficacy theory and provides support for the reliability and validity of the Barriers Efficacy Scale: COPD version.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers Efficacy: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Versionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160265-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers Efficacy: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Version</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Larson, Janet, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret K. Covey, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Mary K. Kapella, PhD, RN, Research Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research was to examine the psychometric properties of the COPD version of the Barriers Efficacy scale, a measure of self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to exercise. This is a modification of McAuley&rsquo;s well established Barriers Efficacy scale. We interviewed 9 people with COPD to identify common reasons that prevent them from participating in a structured exercise program. Based on the results of these interviews we retained all 12 original items and added 3 new items appropriate for people with COPD. The revised instrument was administered by mailed survey to 43 people with COPD. The relationship between barriers efficacy, functional performance and self-reported exercise time/week was examined. Functional Performance was measured with the Functional Performance Inventory (FPI), Leidy __. The mean score for the Barriers Efficacy: COPD was 53 (SD=22) with a range from 16 to 96. Internal consistency reliability was high, Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha .93. Item-total correlations all exceeded .53 and most exceeded .60. There was no evidence of floor or ceiling effects. Significant correlations were observed between barriers efficacy and: total minutes of exercise a week (r=.67), Total Functional Performance Inventory (FPI) (r=.44), FPI physical exertion (r=.63), FPI recreational activity (r=.40) and age (r=.31). Age and FPI physical exertion accounted for 43% of the variance in barriers efficacy, p&lt;.0001. Age and self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to exercise accounted for 48% of the variance in number of minutes of exercise a week. People with a higher level of function were more confident in their ability to overcome barriers to exercise and self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to exercise predicted the amount of exercise they actually performed. This is consistent with self-efficacy theory and provides support for the reliability and validity of the Barriers Efficacy Scale: COPD version.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:46:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:46:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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