2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160269
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterning of Pain with Guided Imagery: Qualitative Analysis of Pain Descriptions
Abstract:
Patterning of Pain with Guided Imagery: Qualitative Analysis of Pain Descriptions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lewandowski, Wendy, PhD, RN, CS
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
The purpose of this study was to analyze verbal descriptions of pain obtained from participants during the course of a larger study that tested the effectiveness of a guided imagery technique to decrease pain in a sample of chronic pain sufferers. Content analysis of participants' pain descriptions was able to provide richness and detail that quantitative measures were unable to provide alone. Within the framework of Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings, the usefulness of guided imagery was built on the premise that there is an underlying process that accounts for how pain is manifested. Guided imagery helped the pain sufferer gain awareness of this process and explore alternative ways of experiencing for greater consistency with well-being. A quasi-experimental, completely randomized design was used. Participants in the treatment group (n=21) used a guided imagery technique over a consecutive 4-day period of time, while those in the control group (n=21) were monitored. Measures of pain were obtained prior to randomization (T1) and at four daily intervals (T2, T3, T4, T5), giving 42 pain descriptions for each time point. Using content analysis, categories were determined for each time point without knowledge of which pain descriptions were from the treatment group and which were from the control group. Groups were then compared on the categorizations that emerged. Eight categories surfaced for each group at T1: tactile images, location of pain, endlessness, powerlessness, cause for pain, quantification of pain, analgesic medication, and impact on sleep. Descriptions of pain as endless continued for control group participants, but not for those in the treatment group. Two additional categories emerged at T2 through T5 for participants in the treatment group: involvement in creating change and affective pain. An appreciation of themes related to the chronic pain experience and how these change with the use of guided imagery can help nurses integrate such a therapy into their practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterning of Pain with Guided Imagery: Qualitative Analysis of Pain Descriptionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160269-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterning of Pain with Guided Imagery: Qualitative Analysis of Pain Descriptions </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lewandowski, Wendy, PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to analyze verbal descriptions of pain obtained from participants during the course of a larger study that tested the effectiveness of a guided imagery technique to decrease pain in a sample of chronic pain sufferers. Content analysis of participants' pain descriptions was able to provide richness and detail that quantitative measures were unable to provide alone. Within the framework of Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings, the usefulness of guided imagery was built on the premise that there is an underlying process that accounts for how pain is manifested. Guided imagery helped the pain sufferer gain awareness of this process and explore alternative ways of experiencing for greater consistency with well-being. A quasi-experimental, completely randomized design was used. Participants in the treatment group (n=21) used a guided imagery technique over a consecutive 4-day period of time, while those in the control group (n=21) were monitored. Measures of pain were obtained prior to randomization (T1) and at four daily intervals (T2, T3, T4, T5), giving 42 pain descriptions for each time point. Using content analysis, categories were determined for each time point without knowledge of which pain descriptions were from the treatment group and which were from the control group. Groups were then compared on the categorizations that emerged. Eight categories surfaced for each group at T1: tactile images, location of pain, endlessness, powerlessness, cause for pain, quantification of pain, analgesic medication, and impact on sleep. Descriptions of pain as endless continued for control group participants, but not for those in the treatment group. Two additional categories emerged at T2 through T5 for participants in the treatment group: involvement in creating change and affective pain. An appreciation of themes related to the chronic pain experience and how these change with the use of guided imagery can help nurses integrate such a therapy into their practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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