2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160270
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Status and Injuries Reported by Illinois Farmers > 55 Years of Age
Abstract:
Health Status and Injuries Reported by Illinois Farmers > 55 Years of Age
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lizer, Shannon, DNSc, APN-CS
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1601 Parkview, Rockford, IL, 61107, USA
Co-Authors:Ann Minnick, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Chip Petrea, PhD, Academic Professional; Linda Edwards, PhD, RN, Professor Emerita
In Illinois, geographically a predominantly agricultural state, the average farmer’s age is 55; many farmers work beyond age 70 (Myers, 1990; Purcshwitz & Field, 1990). Farming is a dangerous occupation (NSC, 1999); farmers aged >55 may experience greater injury risk than farmers of other ages (NSC, 1999; Myers & Hard, 1995). Little is known about their health status, chronic diseases, symptoms, and prescription medication. Purpose: To describe injury experiences, chronic disease status, reported physical symptoms, medication usage, and health status of a random sample of farmers, drawn from a list of Illinois Farm Bureau members ³ 55 years of age (n=401). Theoretical Framework: Haddon’s matrix (1964), an epidemiological model, was used. Methods: Subjects received a mailed survey during winter 2002; a second mailing was sent to non-responders (response rate=47%). 120 working (n=87) and non-working (n=33) male farmers ³ age 55 completed demographic, occupational, health, and SF-36 items. Results: 48 injuries (mean=0.58 injuries per farmer) were reported in 2001, most occurred during farm maintenance (n=30) and animal handling (n=10). Farmers reported hearing changes (79.5%), frequent urination (32.2%), and shortness of breath (25.2%). Diseases included hyperlipidemia (41.5%), hypertension (34.7%), allergies (17.9%) and diabetes (11.9%). Most farmers (72%) reported taking >1 medication. Farmers’ SF-36 scores generally met or exceeded those of US males of the same age. Farmers, ages 55-59, scored lower than the general population on mental health indicators; farmers >59 scored higher on physical and social function indicators than others their age. Conclusions: Triangulation using self-report and objective measures from a larger sample is needed. Rural nurses need to be aware of the strengths and the occupational challenges older farmers bring to health promotion.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Status and Injuries Reported by Illinois Farmers > 55 Years of Ageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160270-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Status and Injuries Reported by Illinois Farmers &gt; 55 Years of Age </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lizer, Shannon, DNSc, APN-CS </td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1601 Parkview, Rockford, IL, 61107, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann Minnick, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Chip Petrea, PhD, Academic Professional; Linda Edwards, PhD, RN, Professor Emerita </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In Illinois, geographically a predominantly agricultural state, the average farmer&rsquo;s age is 55; many farmers work beyond age 70 (Myers, 1990; Purcshwitz &amp; Field, 1990). Farming is a dangerous occupation (NSC, 1999); farmers aged &gt;55 may experience greater injury risk than farmers of other ages (NSC, 1999; Myers &amp; Hard, 1995). Little is known about their health status, chronic diseases, symptoms, and prescription medication. Purpose: To describe injury experiences, chronic disease status, reported physical symptoms, medication usage, and health status of a random sample of farmers, drawn from a list of Illinois Farm Bureau members &sup3; 55 years of age (n=401). Theoretical Framework: Haddon&rsquo;s matrix (1964), an epidemiological model, was used. Methods: Subjects received a mailed survey during winter 2002; a second mailing was sent to non-responders (response rate=47%). 120 working (n=87) and non-working (n=33) male farmers &sup3; age 55 completed demographic, occupational, health, and SF-36 items. Results: 48 injuries (mean=0.58 injuries per farmer) were reported in 2001, most occurred during farm maintenance (n=30) and animal handling (n=10). Farmers reported hearing changes (79.5%), frequent urination (32.2%), and shortness of breath (25.2%). Diseases included hyperlipidemia (41.5%), hypertension (34.7%), allergies (17.9%) and diabetes (11.9%). Most farmers (72%) reported taking &gt;1 medication. Farmers&rsquo; SF-36 scores generally met or exceeded those of US males of the same age. Farmers, ages 55-59, scored lower than the general population on mental health indicators; farmers &gt;59 scored higher on physical and social function indicators than others their age. Conclusions: Triangulation using self-report and objective measures from a larger sample is needed. Rural nurses need to be aware of the strengths and the occupational challenges older farmers bring to health promotion.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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