2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160271
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perception of health in older adults
Abstract:
Perception of health in older adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lorenz, Rebecca, MHA, RN
Title:Ms.
Contact Address:SON, 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Co-Authors:Joanne Kraenzle Schneider, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Poor ratings of perceived health have been shown to predict physical and mental decline in older adults. Thus understanding factors that affect older adults' perception of health may guide interventions to prevent physical and mental decline in this population. In the self-regulation model, a mental image of a threat of illness such as the detection of preclinical symptoms of functional decline, obvious only to the older adult, creates a definition of a problem that triggers coping strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing how older adults rate their health. Two hundred two older adults (75% female; mean age 71.6+5.03 years) rated their health on a 5-point scale. The relationship between perceived health and the SF-36 subscales, fear of falling, age, and performance on the 8-foot-up-and-go was examined using multiple regression. Finally, qualitative data collected through semi-structured interviews were used to confirm the quantitative results. Results showed that older adults who reported higher energy (ß=.427, p<.001) and higher emotional role performance (ß=.154, p<.05) reported higher perceived health [R2=.40, F(8,193)=15.75, p=.000]. Narratives such as these: "Well, you tire easier" and "…when I thought that my mind was gone and the aging process had really caught up with me, I decided that it was over." provides confirmation that energy levels and emotions influence how older adults judge their current health. These findings suggest that older adults judge their health based on levels of perceived energy and emotional role performance. Health care providers need to be aware of what the older adult may be trying to convey when asked how they judge their current health. Further probing into current levels of energy and ability to complete tasks may assist in determining which interventions will improve physical and mental function in older adults. Funded by NINR (RO1 NR04771).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerception of health in older adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160271-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perception of health in older adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lorenz, Rebecca, MHA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joanne Kraenzle Schneider, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Poor ratings of perceived health have been shown to predict physical and mental decline in older adults. Thus understanding factors that affect older adults' perception of health may guide interventions to prevent physical and mental decline in this population. In the self-regulation model, a mental image of a threat of illness such as the detection of preclinical symptoms of functional decline, obvious only to the older adult, creates a definition of a problem that triggers coping strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing how older adults rate their health. Two hundred two older adults (75% female; mean age 71.6+5.03 years) rated their health on a 5-point scale. The relationship between perceived health and the SF-36 subscales, fear of falling, age, and performance on the 8-foot-up-and-go was examined using multiple regression. Finally, qualitative data collected through semi-structured interviews were used to confirm the quantitative results. Results showed that older adults who reported higher energy (&szlig;=.427, p&lt;.001) and higher emotional role performance (&szlig;=.154, p&lt;.05) reported higher perceived health [R2=.40, F(8,193)=15.75, p=.000]. Narratives such as these: &quot;Well, you tire easier&quot; and &quot;&hellip;when I thought that my mind was gone and the aging process had really caught up with me, I decided that it was over.&quot; provides confirmation that energy levels and emotions influence how older adults judge their current health. These findings suggest that older adults judge their health based on levels of perceived energy and emotional role performance. Health care providers need to be aware of what the older adult may be trying to convey when asked how they judge their current health. Further probing into current levels of energy and ability to complete tasks may assist in determining which interventions will improve physical and mental function in older adults. Funded by NINR (RO1 NR04771).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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