2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160273
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determining Probable Participation in a Randomized Clinical Trial
Abstract:
Determining Probable Participation in a Randomized Clinical Trial
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Mallory, Caroline, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Mennonite CON, 301 Edwards Hall - CB#5810, Normal, IL, 61790-5810, USA
Estimating eligibility and decline rates in a population is helpful in planning sampling, recruitment and retention strategies. This cross-sectional descriptive study was designed to determine how likely women were to participate in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV. Women (n=27) from a county detention center and substance abuse treatment center volunteered for the study. The convenience sample was mostly Caucasian/White (n=21), an average of 28 years old, with a monthly income of less than $1000.00. Women were asked to pretend they were being invited to participate in the trial, indicate their willingness to participate, and what assistance would facilitate their participation. Demographic data were used to screen women for inclusion criteria to estimate ineligibility. When asked whether they would volunteer to participate in the intervention study 17 out of 25 indicated that they would; 10 out of 25 indicated that they would be able to give 16 hours to the study; and 11 out of 25 indicated that it would not be hard to participate. Power analysis was used to calculate sample size for the trial, and combined with the percentage of ineligible women and the percentage who would decline, the number of women that would need to be approached at recruitment sites was estimated. Women indicated that transportation, convenience and child-care would facilitate participation. One unanticipated finding was that women on average had 11.4 years of education (range 8-15) suggesting that literacy may be an issue in implementing the intervention. Despite limitations imposed by convenience sampling and hypothetical questions, these findings provided guidance for planning and resource management in sampling, recruitment and retention. These data were also instrumental in establishing access to the target population that was essential in securing funding for the research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDetermining Probable Participation in a Randomized Clinical Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160273-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determining Probable Participation in a Randomized Clinical Trial </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mallory, Caroline, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mennonite CON, 301 Edwards Hall - CB#5810, Normal, IL, 61790-5810, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Estimating eligibility and decline rates in a population is helpful in planning sampling, recruitment and retention strategies. This cross-sectional descriptive study was designed to determine how likely women were to participate in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV. Women (n=27) from a county detention center and substance abuse treatment center volunteered for the study. The convenience sample was mostly Caucasian/White (n=21), an average of 28 years old, with a monthly income of less than $1000.00. Women were asked to pretend they were being invited to participate in the trial, indicate their willingness to participate, and what assistance would facilitate their participation. Demographic data were used to screen women for inclusion criteria to estimate ineligibility. When asked whether they would volunteer to participate in the intervention study 17 out of 25 indicated that they would; 10 out of 25 indicated that they would be able to give 16 hours to the study; and 11 out of 25 indicated that it would not be hard to participate. Power analysis was used to calculate sample size for the trial, and combined with the percentage of ineligible women and the percentage who would decline, the number of women that would need to be approached at recruitment sites was estimated. Women indicated that transportation, convenience and child-care would facilitate participation. One unanticipated finding was that women on average had 11.4 years of education (range 8-15) suggesting that literacy may be an issue in implementing the intervention. Despite limitations imposed by convenience sampling and hypothetical questions, these findings provided guidance for planning and resource management in sampling, recruitment and retention. These data were also instrumental in establishing access to the target population that was essential in securing funding for the research. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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