Spiritual Struggle: Impact on Quality of Life and Life Satisfaction in Women with Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160274
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Struggle: Impact on Quality of Life and Life Satisfaction in Women with Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Spiritual Struggle: Impact on Quality of Life and Life Satisfaction in Women with Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Manning-Walsh, Juanita, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Bronson School of Nursing, 10245 4 Mile Rd, Plainwell, MI, 49080, USA
Co-Authors:Juanita K. Manning-Walsh, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
It is well known that women with breast cancer experience numerous stressors that impact quality of life (QOL) and life satisfaction. While there is a small but growing body of literature about spiritual struggle, little is known about the nature of relationships between spiritual struggle and QOL and life satisfaction. Purpose: To examine the relationships between spiritual struggle and both QOL and life satisfaction in a group of women with breast cancer. Conceptual Framework: This study was part of a larger study that used a stress and coping framework. Participants: A cross-sectional convenience sample of 100 participants recruited from an internet website “Breast Cancer Online Support” http://pages.prodigy.net/replyasap/bc/ was used. Most had Stage I or II breast cancer and a variety of adjuvant therapy combinations. Mean age was nearly 46 years and time since diagnosis was 1-24 months. Method: Questionnaires were mailed with an 87% response rate. Variables were measured using three instruments; FACT-B (Cella et al., 1993) and FACIT-Sp-12 (Fitchett et al., 1996) combined for one composite score for QOL, a subscale of R-COPE (Pargament, 1999) for spiritual struggle, and a repeated single item measuring life satisfaction. Results: The hypotheses were supported. Although modest, there was an inverse relationship between spiritual struggle and both QOL (r=-.296, p<.01) and life satisfaction (r=-.260, p<.01) with spiritual struggle explaining 8.8% of the variance in QOL and 6.8% of the variance in life satisfaction. Women who were younger experienced more spiritual struggle (r=-.224, p<.05) than did older women. Conclusions: Spiritual struggle adds to the stress women with breast cancer experience. This study underscores the need to assess for spiritual struggle throughout the cancer trajectory and to facilitate garnering supportive resources and implementing interventions to cope with spiritual struggle.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual Struggle: Impact on Quality of Life and Life Satisfaction in Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160274-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spiritual Struggle: Impact on Quality of Life and Life Satisfaction in Women with Breast Cancer </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Manning-Walsh, Juanita, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Bronson School of Nursing, 10245 4 Mile Rd, Plainwell, MI, 49080, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Juanita K. Manning-Walsh, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It is well known that women with breast cancer experience numerous stressors that impact quality of life (QOL) and life satisfaction. While there is a small but growing body of literature about spiritual struggle, little is known about the nature of relationships between spiritual struggle and QOL and life satisfaction. Purpose: To examine the relationships between spiritual struggle and both QOL and life satisfaction in a group of women with breast cancer. Conceptual Framework: This study was part of a larger study that used a stress and coping framework. Participants: A cross-sectional convenience sample of 100 participants recruited from an internet website &ldquo;Breast Cancer Online Support&rdquo; http://pages.prodigy.net/replyasap/bc/ was used. Most had Stage I or II breast cancer and a variety of adjuvant therapy combinations. Mean age was nearly 46 years and time since diagnosis was 1-24 months. Method: Questionnaires were mailed with an 87% response rate. Variables were measured using three instruments; FACT-B (Cella et al., 1993) and FACIT-Sp-12 (Fitchett et al., 1996) combined for one composite score for QOL, a subscale of R-COPE (Pargament, 1999) for spiritual struggle, and a repeated single item measuring life satisfaction. Results: The hypotheses were supported. Although modest, there was an inverse relationship between spiritual struggle and both QOL (r=-.296, p&lt;.01) and life satisfaction (r=-.260, p&lt;.01) with spiritual struggle explaining 8.8% of the variance in QOL and 6.8% of the variance in life satisfaction. Women who were younger experienced more spiritual struggle (r=-.224, p&lt;.05) than did older women. Conclusions: Spiritual struggle adds to the stress women with breast cancer experience. This study underscores the need to assess for spiritual struggle throughout the cancer trajectory and to facilitate garnering supportive resources and implementing interventions to cope with spiritual struggle.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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