2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160277
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Content Analysis of Research Evidence in Neonatal Clinical Journals
Abstract:
Content Analysis of Research Evidence in Neonatal Clinical Journals
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:McCain, Gail, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Dean/Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA
Co-Authors:Arax Balian, MPH, RN; JoAnn Glick, MSN, RN Deirdra Williams, BS
The purpose of this review of the evidence was to determine the quantity and type of published research disseminated in neonatal clinical nursing journals. Bedside nurses read clinical journals and it is important that they be exposed to research. The framework was the Hirsh model for locating research evidence. The sample consisted of six clinical journals including: Advances in Neonatal Care, JOGNN, J. of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, Neonatal Network, Newborn & Infant Nursing Reviews, and MCN. A total of 885 articles from January, 1999 through August, 2003 were reviewed. Content analysis was the method used to quantify and categorize the types of research. The analysis included identification of relevant clinical journals, review of the journals for number of research articles, and organization of the research content into similar themes. The results were that 114 (13%) of the total published articles were research reports. Of the 114 research articles, 51% were descriptive studies, 26% were tests of interventions, 22% were case studies, and there was one meta-analysis. Of the 58 descriptive studies, 43% were studies of parents, 39% were about infants, and 18% were about nurses. Of the 30 intervention studies, 23% were about infant temperature taking/control, 20% about feeding, 17% about equipment, 10% about kangaroo care, and 30% were about a variety of topics with no common themes. In conclusion, the research located in neonatal nursing journals addresses issues that are important in neonatal nursing practice. However, only one or no studies were located about other important neonatal nursing practice issues such as pain assessment/control, skin care, co-bedding of multiple birth infants, infants with chronic conditions, and tests of developmental care. This lack of published research in important areas is a call for such studies to be conducted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContent Analysis of Research Evidence in Neonatal Clinical Journalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160277-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Content Analysis of Research Evidence in Neonatal Clinical Journals </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCain, Gail, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean/Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Arax Balian, MPH, RN; JoAnn Glick, MSN, RN Deirdra Williams, BS </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this review of the evidence was to determine the quantity and type of published research disseminated in neonatal clinical nursing journals. Bedside nurses read clinical journals and it is important that they be exposed to research. The framework was the Hirsh model for locating research evidence. The sample consisted of six clinical journals including: Advances in Neonatal Care, JOGNN, J. of Perinatal &amp; Neonatal Nursing, Neonatal Network, Newborn &amp; Infant Nursing Reviews, and MCN. A total of 885 articles from January, 1999 through August, 2003 were reviewed. Content analysis was the method used to quantify and categorize the types of research. The analysis included identification of relevant clinical journals, review of the journals for number of research articles, and organization of the research content into similar themes. The results were that 114 (13%) of the total published articles were research reports. Of the 114 research articles, 51% were descriptive studies, 26% were tests of interventions, 22% were case studies, and there was one meta-analysis. Of the 58 descriptive studies, 43% were studies of parents, 39% were about infants, and 18% were about nurses. Of the 30 intervention studies, 23% were about infant temperature taking/control, 20% about feeding, 17% about equipment, 10% about kangaroo care, and 30% were about a variety of topics with no common themes. In conclusion, the research located in neonatal nursing journals addresses issues that are important in neonatal nursing practice. However, only one or no studies were located about other important neonatal nursing practice issues such as pain assessment/control, skin care, co-bedding of multiple birth infants, infants with chronic conditions, and tests of developmental care. This lack of published research in important areas is a call for such studies to be conducted. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.