2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160278
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Acceptance Training on Psychological and Physical Health
Abstract:
The Effects of Acceptance Training on Psychological and Physical Health
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:McDonald, Patricia, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, Associate Dean and Associate Professor; Laura DeHelian, PhD, RN, CS, Assistant Professor; Hsiu-Ju Chang, PhD Candidate, MSN, RN; Sunida Preechawong, PhD(c), RN; Diana L. Morris, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; Karen
Aging increases elders' vulnerability to chronic illness and almost 80% of older adults have at least one chronic condition. Approximately half of the aged population has difficulty performing daily activities and experience declining physical functioning, anxiety, and depression. Acceptance of one's chronic conditions as a circumstance in life may facilitate management of chronic illness symptoms. However, the effects of providing elders with acceptance training (ACT) to improve their functional status and perceived health while minimizing their anxiety and depression have not been tested. This longitudinal study investigated the short and long-term effects of ACT on psychological and physiological health outcomes in elders with chronic conditions living in retirement communities (RCs). The effects of ACT on acceptance, perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression were examined at four intervals: baseline, immediate, lagged (6 weeks), and extended (12 weeks). Face-to-face interviews were conducted in 6 randomly selected RCs with 15 Black and 47 White elders using well-known measures of perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression. An investigator-developed measure of acceptance of chronic conditions, expanded from an established measure of acceptance of diabetes was used. The ACT intervention combined Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy with music, relaxation, and guided imagery during 6 weekly 2-hour sessions. While sporadic changes over time were found for perceived health, functional status, anxiety, or depression, there were significant changes in the elders’ acceptance of chronic conditions immediately after post-intervention (t=-2.51, p < .05), which persisted at 6 and 12 weeks (t’s=-2.55, -2.96, p’s < .05, .01, respectively). Although the 40% attrition rate reduced the sample size from N=62 to N=37, the significant increases in acceptance over time provides initial evidence for the fidelity of the ACT intervention. The implications of these findings will be further explored and recommendations for future study will be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Acceptance Training on Psychological and Physical Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160278-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Acceptance Training on Psychological and Physical Health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McDonald, Patricia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, Associate Dean and Associate Professor; Laura DeHelian, PhD, RN, CS, Assistant Professor; Hsiu-Ju Chang, PhD Candidate, MSN, RN; Sunida Preechawong, PhD(c), RN; Diana L. Morris, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; Karen </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aging increases elders' vulnerability to chronic illness and almost 80% of older adults have at least one chronic condition. Approximately half of the aged population has difficulty performing daily activities and experience declining physical functioning, anxiety, and depression. Acceptance of one's chronic conditions as a circumstance in life may facilitate management of chronic illness symptoms. However, the effects of providing elders with acceptance training (ACT) to improve their functional status and perceived health while minimizing their anxiety and depression have not been tested. This longitudinal study investigated the short and long-term effects of ACT on psychological and physiological health outcomes in elders with chronic conditions living in retirement communities (RCs). The effects of ACT on acceptance, perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression were examined at four intervals: baseline, immediate, lagged (6 weeks), and extended (12 weeks). Face-to-face interviews were conducted in 6 randomly selected RCs with 15 Black and 47 White elders using well-known measures of perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression. An investigator-developed measure of acceptance of chronic conditions, expanded from an established measure of acceptance of diabetes was used. The ACT intervention combined Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy with music, relaxation, and guided imagery during 6 weekly 2-hour sessions. While sporadic changes over time were found for perceived health, functional status, anxiety, or depression, there were significant changes in the elders&rsquo; acceptance of chronic conditions immediately after post-intervention (t=-2.51, p &lt; .05), which persisted at 6 and 12 weeks (t&rsquo;s=-2.55, -2.96, p&rsquo;s &lt; .05, .01, respectively). Although the 40% attrition rate reduced the sample size from N=62 to N=37, the significant increases in acceptance over time provides initial evidence for the fidelity of the ACT intervention. The implications of these findings will be further explored and recommendations for future study will be addressed. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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