2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160279
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Grandmothers and caregiving: Influences on family well-being
Abstract:
Grandmothers and caregiving: Influences on family well-being
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Musil, Carol, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, Adelbert Rd., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Camille Warner, PhD; May L Wykle, PhD, Dean; Theresa Standing, PhD, Assistant Professor; Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, Associate Dean & Associate Professor; Tanetta Anderson; Jackie Russek, MSN
There has been considerable attention given to the health of grandmothers relative to their caregiving status to grandchildren, but little attention to the link between the grandmother’s well-being and that of her family. This study used the Resiliency Model of Adjustment and Adaptation (McCubbin) to examine whether family stress, grandmother self-efficacy, social support, and grandmother caregiving status to grandchildren (grandmothers raising grandchildren, grandmothers in multi-generation homes, and grandmothers who are non-caregivers to grandchildren) affect family well-being. The Resiliency Model was tested in a sample of 412 grandmothers (130 grandmothers raising grandchildren,114 grandmothers in multi-generation homes, and 168 non-caregiver grandmothers who were recruited using random digit dialing across the state of Ohio; recruitment of the most rare group, grandmothers raising grandchildren, was supplemented with snowball and convenience sampling. Grandmothers provided data by mailed questionnaire during the first wave of a longitudinal study. Grandmothers raising grandchildren and those living in multi-generation homes reported the most family life events and appraised stress, but there were no differences in family communication between caregiver groups. Those raising grandchildren also reported the most challenges to general family functioning. Multiple regression analysis revealed that different regression models explained family well-being for each of the caregiving groups. Grandmother self-efficacy and social support explained about 30% of the variance in family communication in families where grandmothers are raising grandchildren or are non-caregivers to grandchildren, but self-efficacy did not affect family communication for grandmothers in multi-generation homes. Approximately 40% of general family functioning was explained for each grandmother group, although different patterns of family stress, support and self-efficacy contributed to the explained variance. Implications about the relationship between grandmother caregiving, family stress, and family well-being, including potential interventions, are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGrandmothers and caregiving: Influences on family well-beingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160279-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Grandmothers and caregiving: Influences on family well-being</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Musil, Carol, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Adelbert Rd., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Camille Warner, PhD; May L Wykle, PhD, Dean; Theresa Standing, PhD, Assistant Professor; Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, Associate Dean &amp; Associate Professor; Tanetta Anderson; Jackie Russek, MSN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There has been considerable attention given to the health of grandmothers relative to their caregiving status to grandchildren, but little attention to the link between the grandmother&rsquo;s well-being and that of her family. This study used the Resiliency Model of Adjustment and Adaptation (McCubbin) to examine whether family stress, grandmother self-efficacy, social support, and grandmother caregiving status to grandchildren (grandmothers raising grandchildren, grandmothers in multi-generation homes, and grandmothers who are non-caregivers to grandchildren) affect family well-being. The Resiliency Model was tested in a sample of 412 grandmothers (130 grandmothers raising grandchildren,114 grandmothers in multi-generation homes, and 168 non-caregiver grandmothers who were recruited using random digit dialing across the state of Ohio; recruitment of the most rare group, grandmothers raising grandchildren, was supplemented with snowball and convenience sampling. Grandmothers provided data by mailed questionnaire during the first wave of a longitudinal study. Grandmothers raising grandchildren and those living in multi-generation homes reported the most family life events and appraised stress, but there were no differences in family communication between caregiver groups. Those raising grandchildren also reported the most challenges to general family functioning. Multiple regression analysis revealed that different regression models explained family well-being for each of the caregiving groups. Grandmother self-efficacy and social support explained about 30% of the variance in family communication in families where grandmothers are raising grandchildren or are non-caregivers to grandchildren, but self-efficacy did not affect family communication for grandmothers in multi-generation homes. Approximately 40% of general family functioning was explained for each grandmother group, although different patterns of family stress, support and self-efficacy contributed to the explained variance. Implications about the relationship between grandmother caregiving, family stress, and family well-being, including potential interventions, are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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