"Figuring Out Whether They Can Be Trusted": Older Widows' Intentions Relative to Non-Professional, Paid Home Care Helpers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160286
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"Figuring Out Whether They Can Be Trusted": Older Widows' Intentions Relative to Non-Professional, Paid Home Care Helpers
Abstract:
"Figuring Out Whether They Can Be Trusted": Older Widows' Intentions Relative to Non-Professional, Paid Home Care Helpers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Porter, Eileen, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:MU Sinclair SON, 517 Sudbury Drive, Columbia, MO, 65203, USA
Co-Authors:Sue Lasiter, MS, RN, PhD Student; Emily Kristek, Undergraduate Student
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Neuman’s Systems Model was used to guide the study. The client for care was grade-school children. The nature of older persons’ relationships with non-professional helpers is a critical factor in the quality of home care. The few available studies have addressed topics such as role boundaries and responsibilities without regard to the basic facet of the older person’s trust in the helper. This topic was explored in a larger descriptive phenomenological study of the experience of home care with 25 older women (age 80 – 96) who lived alone in their own homes. Over a three-year period, each woman had, on average, 7 tape-recorded, open-ended interviews focused on their perceptions and actions relative to persons who were helping them at home. A descriptive phenomenological method was used to delineate taxonomies of the structure of the experience and its context. With regard to context, the women recognized a risk to personal safety and security (referred to as you never know), which influenced willingness to seek new helpers. The experience of some women who had a non-professional, paid helper was structured in part by figuring out whether the helper can be trusted. Two key parts of this phenomenon were keeping an eye on the helper and spotting the yellow flag waving in my face. Findings were compared to the literature about client-provider relationships and dimensions of home care quality. The issue of trust warrants greater attention during appraisals of the “enabling criteria” of quality care that are related to honesty and dependability of non-professional workers, particularly (but not only) when they are hired privately. Engaging in conversations with older persons over time is a useful means of ascertaining their concerns about trusting non-professional home care helpers. Acknowledgements: Funded by NIH/NINR psychologists. The stressor was the need for medications/IEP. Secondary and tertiary prevention were the nursing focus.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"Figuring Out Whether They Can Be Trusted": Older Widows' Intentions Relative to Non-Professional, Paid Home Care Helpersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160286-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">&quot;Figuring Out Whether They Can Be Trusted&quot;: Older Widows' Intentions Relative to Non-Professional, Paid Home Care Helpers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Porter, Eileen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MU Sinclair SON, 517 Sudbury Drive, Columbia, MO, 65203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue Lasiter, MS, RN, PhD Student; Emily Kristek, Undergraduate Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Neuman&rsquo;s Systems Model was used to guide the study. The client for care was grade-school children. The nature of older persons&rsquo; relationships with non-professional helpers is a critical factor in the quality of home care. The few available studies have addressed topics such as role boundaries and responsibilities without regard to the basic facet of the older person&rsquo;s trust in the helper. This topic was explored in a larger descriptive phenomenological study of the experience of home care with 25 older women (age 80 &ndash; 96) who lived alone in their own homes. Over a three-year period, each woman had, on average, 7 tape-recorded, open-ended interviews focused on their perceptions and actions relative to persons who were helping them at home. A descriptive phenomenological method was used to delineate taxonomies of the structure of the experience and its context. With regard to context, the women recognized a risk to personal safety and security (referred to as you never know), which influenced willingness to seek new helpers. The experience of some women who had a non-professional, paid helper was structured in part by figuring out whether the helper can be trusted. Two key parts of this phenomenon were keeping an eye on the helper and spotting the yellow flag waving in my face. Findings were compared to the literature about client-provider relationships and dimensions of home care quality. The issue of trust warrants greater attention during appraisals of the &ldquo;enabling criteria&rdquo; of quality care that are related to honesty and dependability of non-professional workers, particularly (but not only) when they are hired privately. Engaging in conversations with older persons over time is a useful means of ascertaining their concerns about trusting non-professional home care helpers. Acknowledgements: Funded by NIH/NINR psychologists. The stressor was the need for medications/IEP. Secondary and tertiary prevention were the nursing focus.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:47:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:47:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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