Relocation as a Result of a Long-Term Care Facility Closure: Reported Effect on Staff

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160287
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relocation as a Result of a Long-Term Care Facility Closure: Reported Effect on Staff
Abstract:
Relocation as a Result of a Long-Term Care Facility Closure: Reported Effect on Staff
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Prinsen, Sharon, BSN, RN
Contact Address:SON, R.R. 1, Box 63, Chatfield, MN, 55923, USA
Co-Authors:Joan H. Henely, MS, RN,CNS
Relocation of staff following closure of a healthcare facility produces profound and lasting effects. Loss is commonly experienced. Literature addressing staff relocation following closure of a long-term care facility is limited. A gap exists concerning long-term care staff employment choices and factors influencing these choices post facility closure. The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the effects of closure among staff in a long-term facility. Questionnaires and a focus group session were methods used to elicit staff feedback on issues, concerns, and feelings regarding the closure process and staff transition to other employment opportunities. Categories and themes were identified. Study results identified a sense of loss as a common theme. This loss was experienced due to loss of employment, identity, family, and control. These losses resulted in feelings of anger, sadness, betrayal, frustration, and depression similar to Relocation Stress Syndrome. Staff employment options post facility closure included seeking employment in the healthcare field, changing careers, seeking additional employment or being unemployed. Factors influencing employment selection included inability to find the long-term care facility atmosphere elsewhere, recognition that the healthcare environment is changing, and additional long-term care facilities may close. Today’s healthcare industry and long-term care are faced with deteriorating finances, decreasing physician participation, fewer managed care contracts, and less reimbursement for services provided. These factors affect the financial state of healthcare facilities, causing more to close permanently. Effective staff transition needs to be promoted with facility closure. Deliberate nursing interventions by administration and an advance practice nurse during and post transition are needed to assist staff with this process. Staff insight into the effect of the relocation process on their lives is critical for future recruitment and retention of caring, committed caregivers in long-term care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelocation as a Result of a Long-Term Care Facility Closure: Reported Effect on Staffen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160287-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relocation as a Result of a Long-Term Care Facility Closure: Reported Effect on Staff </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Prinsen, Sharon, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, R.R. 1, Box 63, Chatfield, MN, 55923, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joan H. Henely, MS, RN,CNS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Relocation of staff following closure of a healthcare facility produces profound and lasting effects. Loss is commonly experienced. Literature addressing staff relocation following closure of a long-term care facility is limited. A gap exists concerning long-term care staff employment choices and factors influencing these choices post facility closure. The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the effects of closure among staff in a long-term facility. Questionnaires and a focus group session were methods used to elicit staff feedback on issues, concerns, and feelings regarding the closure process and staff transition to other employment opportunities. Categories and themes were identified. Study results identified a sense of loss as a common theme. This loss was experienced due to loss of employment, identity, family, and control. These losses resulted in feelings of anger, sadness, betrayal, frustration, and depression similar to Relocation Stress Syndrome. Staff employment options post facility closure included seeking employment in the healthcare field, changing careers, seeking additional employment or being unemployed. Factors influencing employment selection included inability to find the long-term care facility atmosphere elsewhere, recognition that the healthcare environment is changing, and additional long-term care facilities may close. Today&rsquo;s healthcare industry and long-term care are faced with deteriorating finances, decreasing physician participation, fewer managed care contracts, and less reimbursement for services provided. These factors affect the financial state of healthcare facilities, causing more to close permanently. Effective staff transition needs to be promoted with facility closure. Deliberate nursing interventions by administration and an advance practice nurse during and post transition are needed to assist staff with this process. Staff insight into the effect of the relocation process on their lives is critical for future recruitment and retention of caring, committed caregivers in long-term care. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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