Relationships between Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and the Delivery of a Preterm Infant: an Analysis of Missouri Birth Certificate Data

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160289
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationships between Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and the Delivery of a Preterm Infant: an Analysis of Missouri Birth Certificate Data
Abstract:
Relationships between Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and the Delivery of a Preterm Infant: an Analysis of Missouri Birth Certificate Data
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Rottier, Kara, BS, RN
Contact Address:SON, 8165 S. Verdev Drive, Oak Creek, WI, 53154, USA
Co-Authors:Teresa S. Johnson, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Russell S. Kirby, PhD, MS, FACE, Professor
Obesity is one of America’s most serious health problems. In addition to increased risks of heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension, obese women face increased challenges during their pregnancies and childbearing. Some of these difficulties during pregnancy include gestational diabetes, infectious morbidity, post partum hemorrhage, delivery of large for gestational age infants, and stillbirth. There has also been discussion surrounding an obese women’s risk for delivery of a premature infant. However, the findings from published research are conflicting and inconclusive as to the nature of this relationship. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship between maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and risk of prematurity. The sample for this study was obtained from birth records of infants born between 1998 and 2000 in the state of Missouri. Demographic data will be reported using means and frequencies and categorized by maternal prepregnancy BMI. The categories for maternal prepregnancy BMI are as follows: overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2), or obese (>30 kg/m2). In addition, multivariate and logistic regression models will be used to calculate risk of delivery of a very preterm (<32 weeks) or preterm (32-36 6/7 weeks) infant based on maternal prepregnancy BMI. Nursing implications from this research are numerous. As additional risks become documented for obese pregnant women, the role of preconceptual counseling becomes even more significant. Early prenatal care takes on additional importance to ensure advising regarding appropriate weight gain for the pregnancies of overweight and obese women. Unique interventions to screen and educate patients regarding the signs and symptoms of preterm labor should be developed. The results of this study can be used to provide data to document the need for support for prevention and therapies for obesity at all ages.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationships between Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and the Delivery of a Preterm Infant: an Analysis of Missouri Birth Certificate Dataen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160289-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationships between Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and the Delivery of a Preterm Infant: an Analysis of Missouri Birth Certificate Data </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rottier, Kara, BS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 8165 S. Verdev Drive, Oak Creek, WI, 53154, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Teresa S. Johnson, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Russell S. Kirby, PhD, MS, FACE, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Obesity is one of America&rsquo;s most serious health problems. In addition to increased risks of heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension, obese women face increased challenges during their pregnancies and childbearing. Some of these difficulties during pregnancy include gestational diabetes, infectious morbidity, post partum hemorrhage, delivery of large for gestational age infants, and stillbirth. There has also been discussion surrounding an obese women&rsquo;s risk for delivery of a premature infant. However, the findings from published research are conflicting and inconclusive as to the nature of this relationship. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship between maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and risk of prematurity. The sample for this study was obtained from birth records of infants born between 1998 and 2000 in the state of Missouri. Demographic data will be reported using means and frequencies and categorized by maternal prepregnancy BMI. The categories for maternal prepregnancy BMI are as follows: overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2), or obese (&gt;30 kg/m2). In addition, multivariate and logistic regression models will be used to calculate risk of delivery of a very preterm (&lt;32 weeks) or preterm (32-36 6/7 weeks) infant based on maternal prepregnancy BMI. Nursing implications from this research are numerous. As additional risks become documented for obese pregnant women, the role of preconceptual counseling becomes even more significant. Early prenatal care takes on additional importance to ensure advising regarding appropriate weight gain for the pregnancies of overweight and obese women. Unique interventions to screen and educate patients regarding the signs and symptoms of preterm labor should be developed. The results of this study can be used to provide data to document the need for support for prevention and therapies for obesity at all ages. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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