Self-care and Dependent-care of School-aged Children Experiencing Sickle Cell Disease Pain at Home

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160292
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-care and Dependent-care of School-aged Children Experiencing Sickle Cell Disease Pain at Home
Abstract:
Self-care and Dependent-care of School-aged Children Experiencing Sickle Cell Disease Pain at Home
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Schmidt, Nola, PhD, RN
Contact Address:CON, 836 LaPorte Avenue, Valparaiso, IN, 46383, USA
Pain is the hallmark symptom of sickle cell disease, and further investigation about the actions performed by children and their parents to alleviate pain is indicated. This study sought to describe the self-care and dependent-care pain alleviation measures performed by and for school-aged children in the home when they are experiencing pain associated with sickle cell disease. A second aim of the study was to describe children’s and parents’ perceptions regarding the effectiveness of the pain alleviation measures identified. Findings of the study were examined for congruence with select components of Orem’s (2001) nursing theory. Using ethnography, personal descriptions of occasions when children experienced sickle cell disease pain at home were elicited. Interviews with 8 children and 10 parents were conducted until saturation was achieved. Emerging from ongoing analysis of the data, the model, Children and Parents: Knowing What Families Go Through, involved three nested themes: being careful, dealing with it, and having a crisis. Care actions for each theme were identified and ranked according to effectiveness. Data indicated that the hallmark concept of self-care and dependent-care of school-aged children is knowledge. Children know what interventions are effective in alleviating their pain, having learned to implement these actions independently or with assistance from caregivers. Through knowledge about their children and sickle cell disease, parents use their expertise to provide dependent-care to alleviate their children’s pain. Strong support for select theoretical components of the self-care deficit theory of nursing was found. Children are developing capabilities to engage in self-care grounded in their knowledge. Children and parents, using their knowledge to perform estimative, transitional, and productive operations, made decisions about the course of their actions, based on their perceptions of expected desirability. The parental-child dyad was identified as a dependent-care system performing the actions needed to alleviate pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-care and Dependent-care of School-aged Children Experiencing Sickle Cell Disease Pain at Homeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160292-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-care and Dependent-care of School-aged Children Experiencing Sickle Cell Disease Pain at Home </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmidt, Nola, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 836 LaPorte Avenue, Valparaiso, IN, 46383, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain is the hallmark symptom of sickle cell disease, and further investigation about the actions performed by children and their parents to alleviate pain is indicated. This study sought to describe the self-care and dependent-care pain alleviation measures performed by and for school-aged children in the home when they are experiencing pain associated with sickle cell disease. A second aim of the study was to describe children&rsquo;s and parents&rsquo; perceptions regarding the effectiveness of the pain alleviation measures identified. Findings of the study were examined for congruence with select components of Orem&rsquo;s (2001) nursing theory. Using ethnography, personal descriptions of occasions when children experienced sickle cell disease pain at home were elicited. Interviews with 8 children and 10 parents were conducted until saturation was achieved. Emerging from ongoing analysis of the data, the model, Children and Parents: Knowing What Families Go Through, involved three nested themes: being careful, dealing with it, and having a crisis. Care actions for each theme were identified and ranked according to effectiveness. Data indicated that the hallmark concept of self-care and dependent-care of school-aged children is knowledge. Children know what interventions are effective in alleviating their pain, having learned to implement these actions independently or with assistance from caregivers. Through knowledge about their children and sickle cell disease, parents use their expertise to provide dependent-care to alleviate their children&rsquo;s pain. Strong support for select theoretical components of the self-care deficit theory of nursing was found. Children are developing capabilities to engage in self-care grounded in their knowledge. Children and parents, using their knowledge to perform estimative, transitional, and productive operations, made decisions about the course of their actions, based on their perceptions of expected desirability. The parental-child dyad was identified as a dependent-care system performing the actions needed to alleviate pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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