Development and Psychometric Properties of the Opioid Side Effects Scale for Postoperative Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160293
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Psychometric Properties of the Opioid Side Effects Scale for Postoperative Patients
Abstract:
Development and Psychometric Properties of the Opioid Side Effects Scale for Postoperative Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Seo, Yaewon, MSN, RN
Contact Address:SON, 3305 Avalon Road, Shaker Heights, OH, 44120, USA
Co-Authors:Xiaomei Cong, PhD(c), MSN, RN; Shih-Tzu Huang, MSN, RN, PhD Student; Marion Good, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Opioids partially relieve postoperative pain, but often have unpleasant side effects. The purpose was to report the psychometric properties of the Opioid Side Effects Scale (OSES) measuring the intensity of six side effects calculated as a total score in postoperative patients. The side effects measured were: nausea, vomiting, drowsiness/dizziness, pruritus, urinary retention, and respiratory depression. Measurement of opioid side effect will permit testing of the theory of a balance between analgesia and side effect (Good & Moore, 1997). Using a correlational design, research nurses rated respiratory rate and asked 199 patients to rate the intensity (0–3, none to severe) of five side effects every 4 hours from 8 am to 8 pm on postoperative days 1 and 2. The daily range was 0 to 22 points, (0-72 possible). Because patients with patient controlled analgesia have treatments for side effects ordered, treatments and opioid intake were used to validate the OSES. Twelve kinds of treatments to control side effects were recorded from the chart. Criterion-related validity of OSES was supported by mean side effects, treatments, and opioid intake that all decreased by day 2 (Table 1). Validity of OSES was further supported by significant, moderate, and positive Table 1 Validity Opioid Side Effects # Treatments Opioid Intake(mg) Day M(SD) M(SD) M(SD) 1 8(5) .4(.7) 59(25) 2 4(4) .1(.4) 32(25) correlations with opioid intake, r=.33, and treatments, r=.31-.33. Those who received treatments had significantly higher OSES scores than those who did not, p < .001. Test-retest reliability was supported with moderate correlations across the four time points each day with highest correlations between adjacent time points on day 1 (r=.40-.50), when they would likely be most stable. The OSES can be used by nursing researchers to quantify side effects of postoperative opioids to study relationships with pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Psychometric Properties of the Opioid Side Effects Scale for Postoperative Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160293-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Psychometric Properties of the Opioid Side Effects Scale for Postoperative Patients </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Seo, Yaewon, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3305 Avalon Road, Shaker Heights, OH, 44120, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Xiaomei Cong, PhD(c), MSN, RN; Shih-Tzu Huang, MSN, RN, PhD Student; Marion Good, PhD, RN, Associate Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Opioids partially relieve postoperative pain, but often have unpleasant side effects. The purpose was to report the psychometric properties of the Opioid Side Effects Scale (OSES) measuring the intensity of six side effects calculated as a total score in postoperative patients. The side effects measured were: nausea, vomiting, drowsiness/dizziness, pruritus, urinary retention, and respiratory depression. Measurement of opioid side effect will permit testing of the theory of a balance between analgesia and side effect (Good &amp; Moore, 1997). Using a correlational design, research nurses rated respiratory rate and asked 199 patients to rate the intensity (0&ndash;3, none to severe) of five side effects every 4 hours from 8 am to 8 pm on postoperative days 1 and 2. The daily range was 0 to 22 points, (0-72 possible). Because patients with patient controlled analgesia have treatments for side effects ordered, treatments and opioid intake were used to validate the OSES. Twelve kinds of treatments to control side effects were recorded from the chart. Criterion-related validity of OSES was supported by mean side effects, treatments, and opioid intake that all decreased by day 2 (Table 1). Validity of OSES was further supported by significant, moderate, and positive Table 1 Validity Opioid Side Effects # Treatments Opioid Intake(mg) Day M(SD) M(SD) M(SD) 1 8(5) .4(.7) 59(25) 2 4(4) .1(.4) 32(25) correlations with opioid intake, r=.33, and treatments, r=.31-.33. Those who received treatments had significantly higher OSES scores than those who did not, p &lt; .001. Test-retest reliability was supported with moderate correlations across the four time points each day with highest correlations between adjacent time points on day 1 (r=.40-.50), when they would likely be most stable. The OSES can be used by nursing researchers to quantify side effects of postoperative opioids to study relationships with pain. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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