2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160297
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Depression Among Elderly Thai Immigrants
Abstract:
Perceptions of Depression Among Elderly Thai Immigrants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Soonthornchaiya, Rangsiman, MS, RN
Contact Address:Mental Health Nursing, CON, 845 S. Damen Avenue 9th floor, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
To elicit elderly Thai immigrants’ perceptions of depression, specifically how they define depression and its symptomatology and cause. Subjects: A convenience sample of 10 male and 10 female Thai elders, ranging from 60 to 84 years of ages, and now living in the United States was recruited from Thai temples in the Chicago area. Methods: This was a qualitative study. Data were collected through demographic questionnaire, semi-structured interviews and field notes. The demographic questionnaire was completed followed by the interview guide. Field notes were taken during and after each interview. All interviews were audiotaped and lasted approximately 60-90 minutes. The hermeneutic model (Diekelmann and Allen, 1989) was used to analyze the data. Results: Preliminary results revealed that depression was defined as disappointment and loneliness and its symptomatology fell into these categories: behavioral symptoms, somatic symptoms, cognitive symptoms, and affective symptoms. Behavioral symptoms included being quiet, isolated and aggressive. Somatic symptoms consisted of body pain, heart palpitations, and pressure in their heart whereas cognitive symptoms were negative thoughts of the self, the world and the future. Affective symptoms were described as being unhappy, dissatisfied, discouraged and angry. This sample perceived that losses caused depression, especially loss of a family member and a significant decline in one’s health status. They also viewed negative thinking as a cause. Discussion: This study provides an initial understanding of depression as viewed by elderly Thai immigrants. Findings can be used to develop culturally specific assessments and treatments of depression among elderly Thai immigrants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Depression Among Elderly Thai Immigrantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160297-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Depression Among Elderly Thai Immigrants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Soonthornchaiya, Rangsiman, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mental Health Nursing, CON, 845 S. Damen Avenue 9th floor, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To elicit elderly Thai immigrants&rsquo; perceptions of depression, specifically how they define depression and its symptomatology and cause. Subjects: A convenience sample of 10 male and 10 female Thai elders, ranging from 60 to 84 years of ages, and now living in the United States was recruited from Thai temples in the Chicago area. Methods: This was a qualitative study. Data were collected through demographic questionnaire, semi-structured interviews and field notes. The demographic questionnaire was completed followed by the interview guide. Field notes were taken during and after each interview. All interviews were audiotaped and lasted approximately 60-90 minutes. The hermeneutic model (Diekelmann and Allen, 1989) was used to analyze the data. Results: Preliminary results revealed that depression was defined as disappointment and loneliness and its symptomatology fell into these categories: behavioral symptoms, somatic symptoms, cognitive symptoms, and affective symptoms. Behavioral symptoms included being quiet, isolated and aggressive. Somatic symptoms consisted of body pain, heart palpitations, and pressure in their heart whereas cognitive symptoms were negative thoughts of the self, the world and the future. Affective symptoms were described as being unhappy, dissatisfied, discouraged and angry. This sample perceived that losses caused depression, especially loss of a family member and a significant decline in one&rsquo;s health status. They also viewed negative thinking as a cause. Discussion: This study provides an initial understanding of depression as viewed by elderly Thai immigrants. Findings can be used to develop culturally specific assessments and treatments of depression among elderly Thai immigrants. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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