2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160299
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Grandmothers’ Changes in Caregiving Status
Abstract:
Grandmothers’ Changes in Caregiving Status
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Standing, Theresa, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Carol Musil, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Over two million grandmothers are currently providing full or supplemental care for grandchildren living in their homes. Often these caregiving roles are in flux as living arrangements change and parents assume more or less responsibility for their children. The experiences of these changes in caregiving status have not yet been examined. Thus, the purpose of this qualitative study is to learn how grandmothers who experience these changes in family composition perceive the changes for themselves and their families. The philosophical framework underpinning this study is hermeneutic phenomenology, which seeks to elicit and describe the meaning and nature of human experiences. Changes in caregiving status provide an opportunity to reflect on the meanings of caregiving. This project is part of a larger, longitudinal study of primary caregiving, supplemental caregiving and traditional grandmothers. Approximately 10% of the larger sample, or about 40 grandmothers across the three caregiving categories have indicated a change in caregiving status during the first year of the study. These white and African American grandmothers are being asked to participate in phone interviews as they indicate a caregiving status change. For this phenomenological study, in-depth telephone interviews are being conducted with the grandmothers, audiotape recorded and transcribed verbatim. A grand tour question, “Tell me the story of the changes in your family during the past year” guides the interview. Data are being managed using QRSN5 software and analyzed using the Giorgi approach to thematic analysis. Rigor of the study will be insured using criteria for qualitative research as outlined by Lincoln and Guba. Emerging themes indicate that grandmothers have a variety of experiences with their changes in caregiving status, with some grandmothers experiencing sadness and others relief with the changes in caregiving status. Health professionals are encouraged to recognize the unique meanings that caregiving has for grandmothers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGrandmothers’ Changes in Caregiving Statusen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160299-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Grandmothers&rsquo; Changes in Caregiving Status </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Standing, Theresa, PhD, RN </td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Carol Musil, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over two million grandmothers are currently providing full or supplemental care for grandchildren living in their homes. Often these caregiving roles are in flux as living arrangements change and parents assume more or less responsibility for their children. The experiences of these changes in caregiving status have not yet been examined. Thus, the purpose of this qualitative study is to learn how grandmothers who experience these changes in family composition perceive the changes for themselves and their families. The philosophical framework underpinning this study is hermeneutic phenomenology, which seeks to elicit and describe the meaning and nature of human experiences. Changes in caregiving status provide an opportunity to reflect on the meanings of caregiving. This project is part of a larger, longitudinal study of primary caregiving, supplemental caregiving and traditional grandmothers. Approximately 10% of the larger sample, or about 40 grandmothers across the three caregiving categories have indicated a change in caregiving status during the first year of the study. These white and African American grandmothers are being asked to participate in phone interviews as they indicate a caregiving status change. For this phenomenological study, in-depth telephone interviews are being conducted with the grandmothers, audiotape recorded and transcribed verbatim. A grand tour question, &ldquo;Tell me the story of the changes in your family during the past year&rdquo; guides the interview. Data are being managed using QRSN5 software and analyzed using the Giorgi approach to thematic analysis. Rigor of the study will be insured using criteria for qualitative research as outlined by Lincoln and Guba. Emerging themes indicate that grandmothers have a variety of experiences with their changes in caregiving status, with some grandmothers experiencing sadness and others relief with the changes in caregiving status. Health professionals are encouraged to recognize the unique meanings that caregiving has for grandmothers. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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