2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160301
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Connecting: Perceptions of Becoming a Faculty Mentor
Abstract:
Connecting: Perceptions of Becoming a Faculty Mentor
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Thurn, Kay, PsyD, MS, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 3700 West 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA
Co-Authors:Carol T. Kostovich, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Agnes Polous, ND, MS, RN, Associate Professor
The school of nursing faculty at a Midwestern liberal arts university created an innovative group mentoring course to support students’ progression through the undergraduate nursing program. The foundation of the mentoring program is the dynamic relationship between novice and expert. As one of the five central concepts in the school of nursing’s conceptual framework, caring was selected as the foundational tenet of the mentoring course. Benner and Wrubel’s (1989) caring principles were incorporated into this program and served as the framework for this study. Students are enrolled in this one-hour course for each of their 4 semesters in the upper division nursing curriculum. Group membership (faculty and students) is consistent throughout this time. The mentoring course requires faculty to lead a process-oriented group. Faculty are confident in teaching courses that are content-driven but have struggled with the unstructured nature of facilitating a process-oriented group. Therefore, the role of group mentor has been identified by faculty as very challenging. The purpose of this study was to explore faculty members’ perceptions of assuming the role of a group mentor. Eight subjects participated in audiotaped interviews guided by six open-ended questions. Three faculty researchers, using a qualitative analysis computer software program and an adaptation of Colaizzi’s (1978) phenomenological data analysis method, analyzed data. Four themes emerged, including uncertainty, evolution, environment, and mutuality. These research findings will provide the basis for establishing a mentor resource program to assist faculty in developing their mentoring skills with a group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConnecting: Perceptions of Becoming a Faculty Mentoren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160301-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Connecting: Perceptions of Becoming a Faculty Mentor </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thurn, Kay, PsyD, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3700 West 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol T. Kostovich, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Agnes Polous, ND, MS, RN, Associate Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The school of nursing faculty at a Midwestern liberal arts university created an innovative group mentoring course to support students&rsquo; progression through the undergraduate nursing program. The foundation of the mentoring program is the dynamic relationship between novice and expert. As one of the five central concepts in the school of nursing&rsquo;s conceptual framework, caring was selected as the foundational tenet of the mentoring course. Benner and Wrubel&rsquo;s (1989) caring principles were incorporated into this program and served as the framework for this study. Students are enrolled in this one-hour course for each of their 4 semesters in the upper division nursing curriculum. Group membership (faculty and students) is consistent throughout this time. The mentoring course requires faculty to lead a process-oriented group. Faculty are confident in teaching courses that are content-driven but have struggled with the unstructured nature of facilitating a process-oriented group. Therefore, the role of group mentor has been identified by faculty as very challenging. The purpose of this study was to explore faculty members&rsquo; perceptions of assuming the role of a group mentor. Eight subjects participated in audiotaped interviews guided by six open-ended questions. Three faculty researchers, using a qualitative analysis computer software program and an adaptation of Colaizzi&rsquo;s (1978) phenomenological data analysis method, analyzed data. Four themes emerged, including uncertainty, evolution, environment, and mutuality. These research findings will provide the basis for establishing a mentor resource program to assist faculty in developing their mentoring skills with a group. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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