A Qualitative Analysis: Nature of the Role of Clincial Faculty when Teaching Critical Thinking

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160303
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Qualitative Analysis: Nature of the Role of Clincial Faculty when Teaching Critical Thinking
Abstract:
A Qualitative Analysis: Nature of the Role of Clincial Faculty when Teaching Critical Thinking
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Twibell, K., DNS, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, Cooper Science Building, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA
Co-Authors:Marilyn Ryan, EdD, RN, Director; Graduate Program, Mary Hermiz, EdD, RN, Director
Critical thinking is essential for safe, effective nursing practice. Nursing faculty are accountable for teaching students to think critically. Specific strategies for teaching critical thinking have been suggested, such as asking questions, reviewing journals, and posing case studies and simulations. However, little is known about the “human component of clinical teaching” (Jacobson, 1996) as it specifically relates to teaching critical thinking. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine perceptions of clinical nursing instructors about the nature of the role of faculty in shaping baccalaureate students’ thinking skills during patient care experiences. The conceptual framework was Scheffer and Rubenfeld’s (2000) consensus statement on critical thinking in nursing. The methodology was qualitative with multiple case studies. Participants were six clinical nursing faculty from five specialty areas in one baccalaureate nursing program. Each informant participated in three recorded interviews. Spradley’s (1979) domain and taxonomic analysis guided data analysis. One domain and taxonomy that emerged was “instructor role,” characterized by three dimensions: faculty-as-helper, instructor characteristics, and faculty-as-motivator. Conceptual subcategories of faculty-as-helper included asking facilitative questions, suggesting resources, instilling confidence, and guiding through dialogue. Conceptual subcategories of instructor characteristics included creativity, perseverance, caring, nursing knowledge, listening ability, and encouragement. Conceptual subcategories of faculty-as-motivator included verbal rewards, non-verbal rewards, and supporting reward structures. From the rich descriptions of informants, findings clearly suggested that, while it is important to know “what to do” to teach critical thinking, it is also important to know “how to do” it. Results can guide clinical nursing faculty in developing the “ways of being” that augment the use of specific strategies when teaching students to think critically. Further data analysis will examine faculty perceptions about evaluating critical thinking in the clinical setting. Future research can include student perceptions about the clinical faculty role in teaching and evaluating critical thinking.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Qualitative Analysis: Nature of the Role of Clincial Faculty when Teaching Critical Thinkingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160303-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Qualitative Analysis: Nature of the Role of Clincial Faculty when Teaching Critical Thinking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twibell, K., DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Cooper Science Building, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn Ryan, EdD, RN, Director; Graduate Program, Mary Hermiz, EdD, RN, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Critical thinking is essential for safe, effective nursing practice. Nursing faculty are accountable for teaching students to think critically. Specific strategies for teaching critical thinking have been suggested, such as asking questions, reviewing journals, and posing case studies and simulations. However, little is known about the &ldquo;human component of clinical teaching&rdquo; (Jacobson, 1996) as it specifically relates to teaching critical thinking. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine perceptions of clinical nursing instructors about the nature of the role of faculty in shaping baccalaureate students&rsquo; thinking skills during patient care experiences. The conceptual framework was Scheffer and Rubenfeld&rsquo;s (2000) consensus statement on critical thinking in nursing. The methodology was qualitative with multiple case studies. Participants were six clinical nursing faculty from five specialty areas in one baccalaureate nursing program. Each informant participated in three recorded interviews. Spradley&rsquo;s (1979) domain and taxonomic analysis guided data analysis. One domain and taxonomy that emerged was &ldquo;instructor role,&rdquo; characterized by three dimensions: faculty-as-helper, instructor characteristics, and faculty-as-motivator. Conceptual subcategories of faculty-as-helper included asking facilitative questions, suggesting resources, instilling confidence, and guiding through dialogue. Conceptual subcategories of instructor characteristics included creativity, perseverance, caring, nursing knowledge, listening ability, and encouragement. Conceptual subcategories of faculty-as-motivator included verbal rewards, non-verbal rewards, and supporting reward structures. From the rich descriptions of informants, findings clearly suggested that, while it is important to know &ldquo;what to do&rdquo; to teach critical thinking, it is also important to know &ldquo;how to do&rdquo; it. Results can guide clinical nursing faculty in developing the &ldquo;ways of being&rdquo; that augment the use of specific strategies when teaching students to think critically. Further data analysis will examine faculty perceptions about evaluating critical thinking in the clinical setting. Future research can include student perceptions about the clinical faculty role in teaching and evaluating critical thinking. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.