2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160304
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of Delirium in Mechanically Ventilated Patients
Abstract:
Correlates of Delirium in Mechanically Ventilated Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Twibell, K., DNS, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, Cooper Science Building, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA
Co-Authors:Debra Siela, DNSc, RN, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT, Assistant Professor; Hosam Baccora, MD, Physician of Internal Medicine; Pamela Anderson, BSN, RN, CCRN, Staff Nurse
Research suggests that many patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation experience delirium. However, little research has examined factors related to the development of delirium. The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of delirium in a sample of critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation. All participants had been mechanically ventilated for at least 24 hours, were breathing spontaneously, and were assessed by a nurse as “alert/awake.” The theoretical framework for the study was Neuman’s System Model (1995), which guides research with clients who are experiencing complex stressors. Three data collection forms were used: the Confusion Assessment Method – Intensive Care Unit for nonverbal patients (CAM-ICU) (Ely et al, 2001), Physiological Assessment of Intubated Patients (PAIP) (Twibell, Siela, Baccora, & Anderson, 2002) and four visual analogue scales to measure dyspnea, fatigue, anxiety and comfort. Data from the PAIP included age, gender, multiple hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, length of time on ventilation, and medical diagnoses. Initial data analysis suggests that 50% of the patients who were assessed as “alert/awake” experience delirium as measured by the CAM-ICU. In addition, early analysis indicates that patients who are on mechanical ventilation for more than four days scored lower than the benchmark on the disorganized thinking portion of the CAM-ICU, indicating the presence of disorganized thinking. Data collection will continue until a sample size of 30 is obtained. The identification of correlates of delirium in mechanically ventilated patients can guide the detection of patients at risk for delirium and the design of approaches to prevent delirium by strengthening lines of defense (Neuman, 1995). In addition, results may verify the need for a multi-item assessment of cognitive states of critically ill patients, such as the CAM-ICU, rather than a single, subjective assessment by the nurse about the patient’s degree of alertness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of Delirium in Mechanically Ventilated Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160304-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of Delirium in Mechanically Ventilated Patients </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twibell, K., DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Cooper Science Building, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra Siela, DNSc, RN, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT, Assistant Professor; Hosam Baccora, MD, Physician of Internal Medicine; Pamela Anderson, BSN, RN, CCRN, Staff Nurse </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research suggests that many patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation experience delirium. However, little research has examined factors related to the development of delirium. The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of delirium in a sample of critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation. All participants had been mechanically ventilated for at least 24 hours, were breathing spontaneously, and were assessed by a nurse as &ldquo;alert/awake.&rdquo; The theoretical framework for the study was Neuman&rsquo;s System Model (1995), which guides research with clients who are experiencing complex stressors. Three data collection forms were used: the Confusion Assessment Method &ndash; Intensive Care Unit for nonverbal patients (CAM-ICU) (Ely et al, 2001), Physiological Assessment of Intubated Patients (PAIP) (Twibell, Siela, Baccora, &amp; Anderson, 2002) and four visual analogue scales to measure dyspnea, fatigue, anxiety and comfort. Data from the PAIP included age, gender, multiple hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, length of time on ventilation, and medical diagnoses. Initial data analysis suggests that 50% of the patients who were assessed as &ldquo;alert/awake&rdquo; experience delirium as measured by the CAM-ICU. In addition, early analysis indicates that patients who are on mechanical ventilation for more than four days scored lower than the benchmark on the disorganized thinking portion of the CAM-ICU, indicating the presence of disorganized thinking. Data collection will continue until a sample size of 30 is obtained. The identification of correlates of delirium in mechanically ventilated patients can guide the detection of patients at risk for delirium and the design of approaches to prevent delirium by strengthening lines of defense (Neuman, 1995). In addition, results may verify the need for a multi-item assessment of cognitive states of critically ill patients, such as the CAM-ICU, rather than a single, subjective assessment by the nurse about the patient&rsquo;s degree of alertness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:48:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:48:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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