Effect of Sedative Music on Anxiety and Pain during Chair Rest after Open-heart Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160306
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Sedative Music on Anxiety and Pain during Chair Rest after Open-heart Surgery
Abstract:
Effect of Sedative Music on Anxiety and Pain during Chair Rest after Open-heart Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Voss, Jo, RN, CNS
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 13450 Pleasant Valley Road, Sturgis, SD, 57785, USA
Open-heart surgery patients in intensive care report anxiety and pain with early activity such as chair rest despite administration of opioid analgesics. Non-pharmacological, complementary methods (such as sedative music and scheduled rest) used to reduce anxiety and pain during chair rest warrant further investigation. The conceptual framework for this study was based on Lazarus and Folkman’s transactional model of stress and coping. A 3-group pretest-posttest experimental design was used to examine the effect of music on the self-reported intensity of anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress during chair rest in adult postoperative cardiac surgery patients. Sixty-one patients were assigned randomly to receive 30 minutes of sedative music (music group), scheduled rest (rest group), or treatment as usual (control group) during chair rest. Anxiety and pain (sensation and distress) were measured with visual analogue scales at the initiation of chair rest (pretest) and after 30 minutes of chair rest (posttest). The repeated measures MANOVA was significant for group differences for anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress from pretest to posttest, and univariate repeated measures ANOVAs were examined on the three variables. In the music group, anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress decreased significantly from pretest to posttest. In the rest group, anxiety and pain sensation decreased significantly, but not pain distress. In addition, the mean difference from pretest to posttest for the three variables was greater for the music group than for the rest group. In the control group, none of the variables changed significantly from pretest to posttest. These findings provide evidence that ICU patients benefit from listening to sedative music during chair rest after open-heart surgery. In addition, scheduled rest may also be beneficial to these patients during chair rest to reduce anxiety and pain sensation, but not pain distress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Sedative Music on Anxiety and Pain during Chair Rest after Open-heart Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160306-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Sedative Music on Anxiety and Pain during Chair Rest after Open-heart Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Voss, Jo, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 13450 Pleasant Valley Road, Sturgis, SD, 57785, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Open-heart surgery patients in intensive care report anxiety and pain with early activity such as chair rest despite administration of opioid analgesics. Non-pharmacological, complementary methods (such as sedative music and scheduled rest) used to reduce anxiety and pain during chair rest warrant further investigation. The conceptual framework for this study was based on Lazarus and Folkman&rsquo;s transactional model of stress and coping. A 3-group pretest-posttest experimental design was used to examine the effect of music on the self-reported intensity of anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress during chair rest in adult postoperative cardiac surgery patients. Sixty-one patients were assigned randomly to receive 30 minutes of sedative music (music group), scheduled rest (rest group), or treatment as usual (control group) during chair rest. Anxiety and pain (sensation and distress) were measured with visual analogue scales at the initiation of chair rest (pretest) and after 30 minutes of chair rest (posttest). The repeated measures MANOVA was significant for group differences for anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress from pretest to posttest, and univariate repeated measures ANOVAs were examined on the three variables. In the music group, anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress decreased significantly from pretest to posttest. In the rest group, anxiety and pain sensation decreased significantly, but not pain distress. In addition, the mean difference from pretest to posttest for the three variables was greater for the music group than for the rest group. In the control group, none of the variables changed significantly from pretest to posttest. These findings provide evidence that ICU patients benefit from listening to sedative music during chair rest after open-heart surgery. In addition, scheduled rest may also be beneficial to these patients during chair rest to reduce anxiety and pain sensation, but not pain distress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:49:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:49:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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