2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160309
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Value of the Asthma Action Plan in Dependent-Care Agency of School Nurses
Abstract:
The Value of the Asthma Action Plan in Dependent-Care Agency of School Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Westhus, Nina, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Contact Address:3525 Caroline, Saint Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Co-Authors:Pat Jamerson, PhD, RN, Nurse Scientist Researcher; Anne Borgmeyer, MSN, CPNP, Nurse Practitioner; Emily Glynn, PNP, BC, Nurse Practitioner; Patti Gyr, MSN, CPNP, Nurse Practitioner
Management of asthma, the most common chronic disorder in children and adolescents, requires the involvement of parents, clinicians, and school personnel. Since children spend a significant portion of the day at school, the school nurse is in a key position to monitor and manage asthma. In order to individualize care of children with asthma, Asthma Action Plans (AAP) are recommended, but there is a lack of data to support the role of the AAP in helping the school nurse to manage asthma effectively. There also is insufficient evidence that school nurses have the training and skills to utilize AAPs confidently. Therefore, dependent-care agency of the school nurse is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which school nurses provide care for children/adolescents with asthma, their level of comfort in doing so, and the availability and value of the AAP in the school setting. The study included a descriptive survey of school nurses in a large metropolitan area. The 42-item questionnaire, based on Orem's Theory of Self-Care, contained a mix of open-ended, fixed-alternative, and demographic items. The school nurses reported similar prevalence of asthma in the schools as in the general population (12%), but only about a third of those students had AAPs at school. The nurses' functions involved in the management of asthma varied, as did their confidence levels. However, of those reporting use of AAPs, 72 percent indicated that having an AAP available increased their confidence in managing asthma. The results of this study suggest that asthma is a prevalent health condition routinely managed by school nurses, but their confidence in meeting the students' needs may be lacking. The Asthma Action Plan may be one way school nurses can improve their dependent-care agency, but others need to be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Value of the Asthma Action Plan in Dependent-Care Agency of School Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160309-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Value of the Asthma Action Plan in Dependent-Care Agency of School Nurses </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westhus, Nina, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3525 Caroline, Saint Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pat Jamerson, PhD, RN, Nurse Scientist Researcher; Anne Borgmeyer, MSN, CPNP, Nurse Practitioner; Emily Glynn, PNP, BC, Nurse Practitioner; Patti Gyr, MSN, CPNP, Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Management of asthma, the most common chronic disorder in children and adolescents, requires the involvement of parents, clinicians, and school personnel. Since children spend a significant portion of the day at school, the school nurse is in a key position to monitor and manage asthma. In order to individualize care of children with asthma, Asthma Action Plans (AAP) are recommended, but there is a lack of data to support the role of the AAP in helping the school nurse to manage asthma effectively. There also is insufficient evidence that school nurses have the training and skills to utilize AAPs confidently. Therefore, dependent-care agency of the school nurse is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which school nurses provide care for children/adolescents with asthma, their level of comfort in doing so, and the availability and value of the AAP in the school setting. The study included a descriptive survey of school nurses in a large metropolitan area. The 42-item questionnaire, based on Orem's Theory of Self-Care, contained a mix of open-ended, fixed-alternative, and demographic items. The school nurses reported similar prevalence of asthma in the schools as in the general population (12%), but only about a third of those students had AAPs at school. The nurses' functions involved in the management of asthma varied, as did their confidence levels. However, of those reporting use of AAPs, 72 percent indicated that having an AAP available increased their confidence in managing asthma. The results of this study suggest that asthma is a prevalent health condition routinely managed by school nurses, but their confidence in meeting the students' needs may be lacking. The Asthma Action Plan may be one way school nurses can improve their dependent-care agency, but others need to be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:49:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:49:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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