2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160314
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reliability of the CMAI in a sample of Chinese Nursing Home Residents
Abstract:
Reliability of the CMAI in a sample of Chinese Nursing Home Residents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Yao, Lan, MS, RN
Contact Address:SON, 1679 Fern Ct, Ann Arbor, MI, 48188, USA
Behavioral problem is a concern in dementia care and research. There are an estimated 820,000 elders aged 60 years and older have dementia in China yet few behavior assessment/management researches have been published. This study sought to describe the behavioral problems of a group of Chinese nursing home residents with dementia by using the CMAI (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory) while simultaneously comparing the reliability of three forms of the CMAI (long, short, and observation). Data was collected on twenty moderately to severely demented subjects from two government-run nursing homes in China using three approaches: 1) the charge nurse (RN) of each subject completed both the long and short form of the CMAI; 2) the nurse aid who spent the most time with the subject completed the long form; and 3) each subject was also videotaped for three standardized 20 minutes sessions per day for two randomly selected days. Then four trained nurses from outside the nursing homes watched the tapes in pairs and independently rated each tape using the CMAI observational form. The most frequently reported behaviors on the long and short forms of the CMAI, across respondents, were similar in rank: handling things inappropriately, pacing, restlessness, hiding things and cursing. The most frequent behaviors observed on videotapes ranked: pacing, performing repetitious mannerisms, trying to go to different places, handling things inappropriately and repetitive sentences/ questions. Reliability analyses upon data from RNs revealed a Cronbach’s a of 0.8614 (short form), and 0.9174 (long form). Interrater agreement rate between RNs and nurse aids was 0.7042; Pearson correlation was 0.8970. Correlations between each two of the three forms of the instruments by correlating global testing means were 0.834, 0.854, 0.913 (p<0.01) respectively. Overall, analyses supported the reliability of the CMAI and its use in Chinese subjects.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReliability of the CMAI in a sample of Chinese Nursing Home Residentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160314-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reliability of the CMAI in a sample of Chinese Nursing Home Residents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yao, Lan, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1679 Fern Ct, Ann Arbor, MI, 48188, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Behavioral problem is a concern in dementia care and research. There are an estimated 820,000 elders aged 60 years and older have dementia in China yet few behavior assessment/management researches have been published. This study sought to describe the behavioral problems of a group of Chinese nursing home residents with dementia by using the CMAI (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory) while simultaneously comparing the reliability of three forms of the CMAI (long, short, and observation). Data was collected on twenty moderately to severely demented subjects from two government-run nursing homes in China using three approaches: 1) the charge nurse (RN) of each subject completed both the long and short form of the CMAI; 2) the nurse aid who spent the most time with the subject completed the long form; and 3) each subject was also videotaped for three standardized 20 minutes sessions per day for two randomly selected days. Then four trained nurses from outside the nursing homes watched the tapes in pairs and independently rated each tape using the CMAI observational form. The most frequently reported behaviors on the long and short forms of the CMAI, across respondents, were similar in rank: handling things inappropriately, pacing, restlessness, hiding things and cursing. The most frequent behaviors observed on videotapes ranked: pacing, performing repetitious mannerisms, trying to go to different places, handling things inappropriately and repetitive sentences/ questions. Reliability analyses upon data from RNs revealed a Cronbach&rsquo;s a of 0.8614 (short form), and 0.9174 (long form). Interrater agreement rate between RNs and nurse aids was 0.7042; Pearson correlation was 0.8970. Correlations between each two of the three forms of the instruments by correlating global testing means were 0.834, 0.854, 0.913 (p&lt;0.01) respectively. Overall, analyses supported the reliability of the CMAI and its use in Chinese subjects.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:49:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:49:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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