2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160318
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Job Satisfaction Among Emergency Department Nurses
Abstract:
Job Satisfaction Among Emergency Department Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Armmer, Francesca, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Bradley University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 808 E. Corrington Ave, Peoria, IL, 61603, USA
Contact Telephone:309-677-2541
Co-Authors:Lissa J. Diefendorf, MSN, BSN, RN, Instructor
Barney (2002) has stated that there will be a nursing shortage of over
one million vacancies by the year 2010. A large component of these
vacancies has been projected to be among nurses who will be needed in the
emergency department (Stiehl, 2002). A focused implementation of
identified factors associated with job satisfaction and life satisfaction
may be central to addressing a critical need: the retention of
professional nurses in the emergency department. The purpose of this study
was to describe job satisfaction characteristics among emergency
department nurses. HertzbergÆs Motivation and Hygiene Theory was the
theoretical framework selected A descriptive non-experimental design was
implemented. Two self-administered questionnaires and a demographic form
were mailed to a random sample of 274 state Emergency Nurses Association
members. The job satisfaction assessment instrument, the Index of Work
Satisfaction (IWS) and the life satisfaction assessment instrument,
Quality of Life Index (QLI). There were 160 questionnaires returned. There
were 112 useable IWS questionnaires (41%) and 99 useable QLI
questionnaires (36%). Regarding work satisfaction, respondents rated
autonomy, pay, organizational policies, and task requirements as of
highest importance. Overall respondents indicated a low level of work
satisfaction. Eighty-seven percent felt that what they do is important.
Eighty percent indicated that they would not go into nursing if they had
it to do all over again. Results from the QLI varied. Emergency nurses
indicated a sustained valuing of what they do. Thus it may be concluded
that given the implementation of measures to address the ôhygiene factorsö
of pay and task requirements, the dissatisfaction expressed may begin to
be resolved. Likewise the importance of autonomy may be strengthened by
the nursing administration, thus strengthening the ômotivation factorsö
for the nurse. By initially describing some of the job satisfaction
components, the need for further research has been evidenced.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleJob Satisfaction Among Emergency Department Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160318-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Job Satisfaction Among Emergency Department Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Armmer, Francesca, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bradley University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 808 E. Corrington Ave, Peoria, IL, 61603, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-677-2541</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">faa@bradley.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lissa J. Diefendorf, MSN, BSN, RN, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Barney (2002) has stated that there will be a nursing shortage of over <br/> one million vacancies by the year 2010. A large component of these <br/> vacancies has been projected to be among nurses who will be needed in the <br/> emergency department (Stiehl, 2002). A focused implementation of <br/> identified factors associated with job satisfaction and life satisfaction <br/> may be central to addressing a critical need: the retention of <br/> professional nurses in the emergency department. The purpose of this study <br/> was to describe job satisfaction characteristics among emergency <br/> department nurses. Hertzberg&AElig;s Motivation and Hygiene Theory was the <br/> theoretical framework selected A descriptive non-experimental design was <br/> implemented. Two self-administered questionnaires and a demographic form <br/> were mailed to a random sample of 274 state Emergency Nurses Association <br/> members. The job satisfaction assessment instrument, the Index of Work <br/> Satisfaction (IWS) and the life satisfaction assessment instrument, <br/> Quality of Life Index (QLI). There were 160 questionnaires returned. There <br/> were 112 useable IWS questionnaires (41%) and 99 useable QLI <br/> questionnaires (36%). Regarding work satisfaction, respondents rated <br/> autonomy, pay, organizational policies, and task requirements as of <br/> highest importance. Overall respondents indicated a low level of work <br/> satisfaction. Eighty-seven percent felt that what they do is important. <br/> Eighty percent indicated that they would not go into nursing if they had <br/> it to do all over again. Results from the QLI varied. Emergency nurses <br/> indicated a sustained valuing of what they do. Thus it may be concluded <br/> that given the implementation of measures to address the &ocirc;hygiene factors&ouml; <br/> of pay and task requirements, the dissatisfaction expressed may begin to <br/> be resolved. Likewise the importance of autonomy may be strengthened by <br/> the nursing administration, thus strengthening the &ocirc;motivation factors&ouml; <br/> for the nurse. By initially describing some of the job satisfaction <br/> components, the need for further research has been evidenced.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:49:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:49:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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