2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160320
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli on Upper Extremity Training in COPD
Abstract:
Effect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli on Upper Extremity Training in COPD
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bauldoff, Gerene, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:614-292-4746
Dyspnea is the primary disabling symptom of COPD. Pulmonary
rehabilitation (PR) provides exercise training, however, post PR adherence
to exercise is poor. By occupying the attention channels with normally
carry dyspneagenic information, distractive auditory stimuli (DAS) may
reduce the perception of dyspnea, promoting increased exercise tolerance
and adherence. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility
of DAS when used with upper extremity training (UET) on perceived dyspnea,
functional performance and health-related quality of life in patients with
moderate to severe COPD. In addition, we attempted to validate the
appropriate music tempo (moderate DAS or slow DAS) to use with UET. An
experimental, randomized, 3-group design (n=10/ group) with testing at
baseline and 4 weeks was used. Thirty patients (13 male, 17 female) with
COPD (FEV1 41.3% + 18% predicted were enrolled. All DAS subjects were
instructed to perform upper extremity training (UET) for up to 15 minutes
3 to 5 times a week using DAS (walkman, audiocassettes). The control group
received the same instructions, but no DAS. Outcome measures were
perceived dyspnea, functional performance using the 6-minute ring and
pegboard (6MRP) count and health-related quality of life. In addition, all
subjects recorded the time of UET performance using self-report (daily
logs). A significant increase was seen in 6MRP count (p=0.002) between
groups. Moderate DAS subjects increased 6MRP count 46 + 21 rings and slow
DAS subjects increased 46 + 20 rings from baseline to 4 weeks whereas
control subjects increased only 5 + 4 rings. No significant differences
were noted for the remaining variables. In conclusion, subjects who used
DAS (music) while performing UET improved functional performance whereas
controls failed to continue improvement. DAS is a feasible adjunct to UET
that may have the potential to augment the effectiveness of PR training.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli on Upper Extremity Training in COPDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160320-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli on Upper Extremity Training in COPD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bauldoff, Gerene, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614-292-4746</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bauldoff.1@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Dyspnea is the primary disabling symptom of COPD. Pulmonary <br/> rehabilitation (PR) provides exercise training, however, post PR adherence <br/> to exercise is poor. By occupying the attention channels with normally <br/> carry dyspneagenic information, distractive auditory stimuli (DAS) may <br/> reduce the perception of dyspnea, promoting increased exercise tolerance <br/> and adherence. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility <br/> of DAS when used with upper extremity training (UET) on perceived dyspnea, <br/> functional performance and health-related quality of life in patients with <br/> moderate to severe COPD. In addition, we attempted to validate the <br/> appropriate music tempo (moderate DAS or slow DAS) to use with UET. An <br/> experimental, randomized, 3-group design (n=10/ group) with testing at <br/> baseline and 4 weeks was used. Thirty patients (13 male, 17 female) with <br/> COPD (FEV1 41.3% + 18% predicted were enrolled. All DAS subjects were <br/> instructed to perform upper extremity training (UET) for up to 15 minutes <br/> 3 to 5 times a week using DAS (walkman, audiocassettes). The control group <br/> received the same instructions, but no DAS. Outcome measures were <br/> perceived dyspnea, functional performance using the 6-minute ring and <br/> pegboard (6MRP) count and health-related quality of life. In addition, all <br/> subjects recorded the time of UET performance using self-report (daily <br/> logs). A significant increase was seen in 6MRP count (p=0.002) between <br/> groups. Moderate DAS subjects increased 6MRP count 46 + 21 rings and slow <br/> DAS subjects increased 46 + 20 rings from baseline to 4 weeks whereas <br/> control subjects increased only 5 + 4 rings. No significant differences <br/> were noted for the remaining variables. In conclusion, subjects who used <br/> DAS (music) while performing UET improved functional performance whereas <br/> controls failed to continue improvement. DAS is a feasible adjunct to UET <br/> that may have the potential to augment the effectiveness of PR training.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:49:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:49:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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