Relationships Among Life Event Stress, Role and Job Strain, and Sleep in Middle-Aged Female Shift Workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160326
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationships Among Life Event Stress, Role and Job Strain, and Sleep in Middle-Aged Female Shift Workers
Abstract:
Relationships Among Life Event Stress, Role and Job Strain, and Sleep in Middle-Aged Female Shift Workers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brown, Pamela, PhD, MS, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing
Title:President
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1228 N. 25th St., Quincy, IL, 62301, USA
Contact Telephone:217-228-5520 6963
Given the complexity of health care, the aging RN workforce, and
patient safety issues; RNs who experience "poor" sleep may be compromising
their level of performance. Lower performance levels have been linked to
longer reaction times, and decreases in memory, attention and judgment
(Monk, 2000; Trinkoff, Storr, & Lipscomb, 2001). The conceptual model for
this research study was derived from NeumanÆs (1995), and Neuman & Fawcett
(2002) Systems Model, and Monk's (2000) Shift Work Coping Model. Stressors
have the ability to cause system imbalances when they penetrate the
flexible and normal lines of defense (Neuman, 1995); Neuman & Fawcett,
2002). Middle-aged women engaged in shift-work experience common stressors
such as life event stress, role and job strain, and perimenopausal
symptoms. These stressors have the ability to individually and/or
collectively penetrate the lines of defense, resulting in system imbalance
or poor quality of sleep. OneÆs beliefs about sleep, as well as one's
knowledge and awareness of sleep hygiene may have the ability to
strengthen the lines of defense by influencing sleep hygiene practices.
The use of sleep hygiene practices may protect or prevent "poor" quality
of sleep. A cross sectional survey design was used to examine the
relationships among life event stress, role and job strain, and sleep in
middle-aged female shift-workers. Subjects were recruited from a regional
rural Midwestern hospital. A supplemental analysis examined group
differences for "good" and "poor" sleepers. Over a hundred (N=102) RNs
participated in the study. Almost three fourths (74%) of the RNs were
categorized as "poor" sleepers. They were predominantly white (96%,
N=100), with a mean age of 52.7 (SD=7.4). Life event stress, role strain,
job strain and perimenopausal symptoms were all significant predictors of
decreased quality of sleep.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationships Among Life Event Stress, Role and Job Strain, and Sleep in Middle-Aged Female Shift Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160326-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationships Among Life Event Stress, Role and Job Strain, and Sleep in Middle-Aged Female Shift Workers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brown, Pamela, PhD, MS, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">President</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1228 N. 25th St., Quincy, IL, 62301, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">217-228-5520 6963</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbrown@brcn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Given the complexity of health care, the aging RN workforce, and <br/> patient safety issues; RNs who experience &quot;poor&quot; sleep may be compromising <br/> their level of performance. Lower performance levels have been linked to <br/> longer reaction times, and decreases in memory, attention and judgment <br/> (Monk, 2000; Trinkoff, Storr, &amp; Lipscomb, 2001). The conceptual model for <br/> this research study was derived from Neuman&AElig;s (1995), and Neuman &amp; Fawcett <br/> (2002) Systems Model, and Monk's (2000) Shift Work Coping Model. Stressors <br/> have the ability to cause system imbalances when they penetrate the <br/> flexible and normal lines of defense (Neuman, 1995); Neuman &amp; Fawcett, <br/> 2002). Middle-aged women engaged in shift-work experience common stressors <br/> such as life event stress, role and job strain, and perimenopausal <br/> symptoms. These stressors have the ability to individually and/or <br/> collectively penetrate the lines of defense, resulting in system imbalance <br/> or poor quality of sleep. One&AElig;s beliefs about sleep, as well as one's <br/> knowledge and awareness of sleep hygiene may have the ability to <br/> strengthen the lines of defense by influencing sleep hygiene practices. <br/> The use of sleep hygiene practices may protect or prevent &quot;poor&quot; quality <br/> of sleep. A cross sectional survey design was used to examine the <br/> relationships among life event stress, role and job strain, and sleep in <br/> middle-aged female shift-workers. Subjects were recruited from a regional <br/> rural Midwestern hospital. A supplemental analysis examined group <br/> differences for &quot;good&quot; and &quot;poor&quot; sleepers. Over a hundred (N=102) RNs <br/> participated in the study. Almost three fourths (74%) of the RNs were <br/> categorized as &quot;poor&quot; sleepers. They were predominantly white (96%, <br/> N=100), with a mean age of 52.7 (SD=7.4). Life event stress, role strain, <br/> job strain and perimenopausal symptoms were all significant predictors of <br/> decreased quality of sleep.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:50:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:50:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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