2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160327
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living in the Doldrums: The lived experience of Dispiritedness in Later Life
Abstract:
Living in the Doldrums: The lived experience of Dispiritedness in Later Life
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Butcher, Howard, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 324NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-7039
Co-Authors:Meghan McGonigal-Kenney, BSN, RN, Predoctoral Student
The experience of less severe ( "mild" ) syndromes of depression are
often under-recognized and poorly understood. While 10-15 percent of
elders experience Major Depression, as many as 20% to 50% are postulated
to less severe syndromes of depression. The term dispiritedness has been
identified as a common experience and is a "mild form of depression"
distinct from Major Depression. Persons in later life often describe
feeling in "low spirits" or dispirited. Antidotal descriptions of
dispiritedness associate the experience of being in "low spirits" as a
loss of energy, will, vitality; loss of meaning and purpose;
disconnectedness; and a sense of hopelessness. The purpose of this
phenomenological investigation was to enhance the understanding of the
experience of dispiritedness by providing a rich and vivid description of
the essential structure of the experience in later life. van Manen's
phenomenological method was used to guide all phases of the research
design, analysis and interpretation. Eleven persons (Female=9; Male=2) who
identified themselves as being in "later life" (52- 93 years of age,
Mean=71) participated in face-to-face 40-70 minute in-depth
phenomenological interviews focusing on describing the experience of
dispiritedness. After the interviews were transcribed, 433 statements
describing the experience of dispiritedness were highlighted, coded, and
then sorted into 21 thematic categories using QSR NUD*IST Nvivo
qualitative data management software program. The 21 themes were
synthesized into 7 essential themes describing the structure of the lived
experience of dispiritedness in later life as: 1) arising from life's
trying transitions, and is experienced as being 2) disengaged from
meaning; 3) a restricting loss of vigor and animation, 4) forlorn
bewilderment and 5) moving between engagement and disengagement while 6)
remaining faithful to enduring connections and 7) engaging in day-to-day
living. Facilitating finding new meaning, instilling hope, keeping active,
and maintaining connections are ways nurses can assist transforming
dispiritedness into inspiritedness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving in the Doldrums: The lived experience of Dispiritedness in Later Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160327-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Living in the Doldrums: The lived experience of Dispiritedness in Later Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butcher, Howard, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 324NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-7039</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">howard-butcher@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Meghan McGonigal-Kenney, BSN, RN, Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The experience of less severe ( &quot;mild&quot; ) syndromes of depression are <br/> often under-recognized and poorly understood. While 10-15 percent of <br/> elders experience Major Depression, as many as 20% to 50% are postulated <br/> to less severe syndromes of depression. The term dispiritedness has been <br/> identified as a common experience and is a &quot;mild form of depression&quot; <br/> distinct from Major Depression. Persons in later life often describe <br/> feeling in &quot;low spirits&quot; or dispirited. Antidotal descriptions of <br/> dispiritedness associate the experience of being in &quot;low spirits&quot; as a <br/> loss of energy, will, vitality; loss of meaning and purpose; <br/> disconnectedness; and a sense of hopelessness. The purpose of this <br/> phenomenological investigation was to enhance the understanding of the <br/> experience of dispiritedness by providing a rich and vivid description of <br/> the essential structure of the experience in later life. van Manen's <br/> phenomenological method was used to guide all phases of the research <br/> design, analysis and interpretation. Eleven persons (Female=9; Male=2) who <br/> identified themselves as being in &quot;later life&quot; (52- 93 years of age, <br/> Mean=71) participated in face-to-face 40-70 minute in-depth <br/> phenomenological interviews focusing on describing the experience of <br/> dispiritedness. After the interviews were transcribed, 433 statements <br/> describing the experience of dispiritedness were highlighted, coded, and <br/> then sorted into 21 thematic categories using QSR NUD*IST Nvivo <br/> qualitative data management software program. The 21 themes were <br/> synthesized into 7 essential themes describing the structure of the lived <br/> experience of dispiritedness in later life as: 1) arising from life's <br/> trying transitions, and is experienced as being 2) disengaged from <br/> meaning; 3) a restricting loss of vigor and animation, 4) forlorn <br/> bewilderment and 5) moving between engagement and disengagement while 6) <br/> remaining faithful to enduring connections and 7) engaging in day-to-day <br/> living. Facilitating finding new meaning, instilling hope, keeping active, <br/> and maintaining connections are ways nurses can assist transforming <br/> dispiritedness into inspiritedness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:50:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:50:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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