Behavioral Correlates of Respiratory Distress Activated by Subcortical Brain Areas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160328
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Behavioral Correlates of Respiratory Distress Activated by Subcortical Brain Areas
Abstract:
Behavioral Correlates of Respiratory Distress Activated by Subcortical Brain Areas
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Campbell, Margaret, PhDc, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Detroit Receiving Hospital
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Nursing Administration, 4201 St. Antoine, Detroit, MI, 48221, USA
Contact Telephone:313 745-3271
Co-Authors:Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
Purpose: To identify the autonomic and emotional behaviors that occurs
in response to an asphyxial threat.
Conceptual framework: Nociceptive responses activated by an asphyxial
threat are evolutionarily ancient and produce measurable behaviors
activated in subcortical brain areas. Some patients with respiratory
distress are unable to self-report due to illness severity or cognitive
impairment. Recognition of behavioral correlates of respiratory distress
is postulated to have clinical and research utility.
Subjects: A convenience sample of 12 adult men and women patients were
recruited from the medical intensive care unit in one urban medical
center. Subjects were scheduled to experience a weaning trial from
mechanical ventilation and were at risk for weaning failure and
respiratory distress.
Method: Subjects were monitored with a capnograph/oximeter and videotaped
continuously for a baseline interval and up to 30 minutes during weaning.
Measures included heart rate, respiratory rate, peripheral oxygen
saturation, end-tidal carbon dioxide, accessory muscle use, paradoxical
breathing pattern, nasal flaring, and a fearful facial expression. At the
end of the trial subjects were asked to identify any primal emotion
experienced during the wean by pointing to a photo array that corresponded
to the subject's race and gender. Other variables collected included age,
gender, race, cognitive state, and primary diagnosis.
Results: The subjects were women (58%) and African-American (83%) who were
experiencing acute (50%) vs. chronic (50%) respiratory failure. Subjects
were cognitively intact (50%) vs. impaired (50%). An array of respiratory
distress behaviors were displayed in response to hypercarbia and hypoxemia
including signs of autonomic responsiveness and fear. Hypercarbia
predicted fear. Behaviors did not differ by cognitive state. Subjects with
acute failure displayed fear more frequently than subjects with chronic
respiratory disease.
Conclusions: Subjects experiencing an asphyxial threat display similar
behaviors arising from subcortical brain areas. Fear conditioning may
contribute to differences displayed by chronic disease subjects.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBehavioral Correlates of Respiratory Distress Activated by Subcortical Brain Areasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160328-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Behavioral Correlates of Respiratory Distress Activated by Subcortical Brain Areas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Campbell, Margaret, PhDc, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Detroit Receiving Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Administration, 4201 St. Antoine, Detroit, MI, 48221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313 745-3271</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcampbe3@dmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To identify the autonomic and emotional behaviors that occurs <br/> in response to an asphyxial threat.<br/> Conceptual framework: Nociceptive responses activated by an asphyxial <br/> threat are evolutionarily ancient and produce measurable behaviors <br/> activated in subcortical brain areas. Some patients with respiratory <br/> distress are unable to self-report due to illness severity or cognitive <br/> impairment. Recognition of behavioral correlates of respiratory distress <br/> is postulated to have clinical and research utility. <br/> Subjects: A convenience sample of 12 adult men and women patients were <br/> recruited from the medical intensive care unit in one urban medical <br/> center. Subjects were scheduled to experience a weaning trial from <br/> mechanical ventilation and were at risk for weaning failure and <br/> respiratory distress.<br/> Method: Subjects were monitored with a capnograph/oximeter and videotaped <br/> continuously for a baseline interval and up to 30 minutes during weaning. <br/> Measures included heart rate, respiratory rate, peripheral oxygen <br/> saturation, end-tidal carbon dioxide, accessory muscle use, paradoxical <br/> breathing pattern, nasal flaring, and a fearful facial expression. At the <br/> end of the trial subjects were asked to identify any primal emotion <br/> experienced during the wean by pointing to a photo array that corresponded <br/> to the subject's race and gender. Other variables collected included age, <br/> gender, race, cognitive state, and primary diagnosis.<br/> Results: The subjects were women (58%) and African-American (83%) who were <br/> experiencing acute (50%) vs. chronic (50%) respiratory failure. Subjects <br/> were cognitively intact (50%) vs. impaired (50%). An array of respiratory <br/> distress behaviors were displayed in response to hypercarbia and hypoxemia <br/> including signs of autonomic responsiveness and fear. Hypercarbia <br/> predicted fear. Behaviors did not differ by cognitive state. Subjects with <br/> acute failure displayed fear more frequently than subjects with chronic <br/> respiratory disease.<br/> Conclusions: Subjects experiencing an asphyxial threat display similar <br/> behaviors arising from subcortical brain areas. Fear conditioning may <br/> contribute to differences displayed by chronic disease subjects.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:50:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:50:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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