Impact of Combination Progressive Strengthening Exercise/Aerobic Exercise Among Women Attending Cardiac Rehabilitation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160336
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Combination Progressive Strengthening Exercise/Aerobic Exercise Among Women Attending Cardiac Rehabilitation
Abstract:
Impact of Combination Progressive Strengthening Exercise/Aerobic Exercise Among Women Attending Cardiac Rehabilitation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Coke, Lola
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-942-6180
Co-Authors:Beth A. Staffileno, Lynne T. Braun, and Meg Gulanick, Associate Professor
Background: Upper body strength decreases with age and physical inactivity post-cardiac event. This strength is needed to perform household physical activities (HPA), an important role for women regardless of age. Purpose: This ongoing study examines: 1) the impact of adding progressive upper body strengthening exercise (SE) to usual care (UC) aerobic exercise in women participating in Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) on perceived performance of HPA, and, 2) the relationship between HPA and muscle strength. Design: This 10-week parallel-group experiment randomizes women into UC or SE groups. To date, 12/30 women have completed the study. Weight for 5 upper body exercises is progressively increased in the SE group using 1-Repitition Maximum (1-RM) strength and % change is calculated. Perceived performance of HPA is measured with the Household Activities Scale (HAS). Analysis: Group HPA difference was determined with the Wilcoxan test and correlation between muscle strength and HPA was determined with Spearman's rho. SE group (n=6) increased muscle strength in all 5 exercises compared to UC group (n=6) (chest press (39% vs. 3%), shoulder press (41% vs. 36%), biceps curl (28% vs. 10%), lateral row (50% vs. 23%) and triceps extension (34% vs. 10%), respectively). Lateral row strength change was significantly correlated with the HAS (r=.737, p=.010). HAS % scores increased in SE group compared to UC group (15% vs.-8%, respectively). Although not statistically significant (Z=-1.662, p=.096), given the small sample, percent improvement in ability to perform HPA is clinically relevant. Beginning progressive strengthening exercise early post cardiac event during CR shows promise as a strengthening benefit for women. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Combination Progressive Strengthening Exercise/Aerobic Exercise Among Women Attending Cardiac Rehabilitationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160336-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Combination Progressive Strengthening Exercise/Aerobic Exercise Among Women Attending Cardiac Rehabilitation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coke, Lola</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-942-6180</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lola_Coke@Rush.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beth A. Staffileno, Lynne T. Braun, and Meg Gulanick, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Upper body strength decreases with age and physical inactivity post-cardiac event. This strength is needed to perform household physical activities (HPA), an important role for women regardless of age. Purpose: This ongoing study examines: 1) the impact of adding progressive upper body strengthening exercise (SE) to usual care (UC) aerobic exercise in women participating in Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) on perceived performance of HPA, and, 2) the relationship between HPA and muscle strength. Design: This 10-week parallel-group experiment randomizes women into UC or SE groups. To date, 12/30 women have completed the study. Weight for 5 upper body exercises is progressively increased in the SE group using 1-Repitition Maximum (1-RM) strength and % change is calculated. Perceived performance of HPA is measured with the Household Activities Scale (HAS). Analysis: Group HPA difference was determined with the Wilcoxan test and correlation between muscle strength and HPA was determined with Spearman's rho. SE group (n=6) increased muscle strength in all 5 exercises compared to UC group (n=6) (chest press (39% vs. 3%), shoulder press (41% vs. 36%), biceps curl (28% vs. 10%), lateral row (50% vs. 23%) and triceps extension (34% vs. 10%), respectively). Lateral row strength change was significantly correlated with the HAS (r=.737, p=.010). HAS % scores increased in SE group compared to UC group (15% vs.-8%, respectively). Although not statistically significant (Z=-1.662, p=.096), given the small sample, percent improvement in ability to perform HPA is clinically relevant. Beginning progressive strengthening exercise early post cardiac event during CR shows promise as a strengthening benefit for women. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:50:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:50:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.