2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160342
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementing a Medication Adherence Intervention in Persons with HIV
Abstract:
Implementing a Medication Adherence Intervention in Persons with HIV
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Erlen, Judith, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 440 Victoria Building, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA
Contact Telephone:412-624-1905
Co-Authors:Susan M. Sereika, PhD, Associate Professor
Research utilization is not without difficulty. This study examined
the fidelity of a 12 week telephone intervention based on social cognitive
theory designed to enhance medication adherence in persons with HIV
prescribed antiretroviral therapy. This study used the 99 subjects
randomized to intervention from a randomized controlled trial testing the
effectiveness of an adherence intervention over time (1R01 NR04749). The
sample included 66 males (66.7%). Slightly more than half (54.5%) were
white. The average age was 39.68 plus or minus.98 years. Subjects completed 13.09 plus or minus 2.30
years of formal education. The number of intervention sessions delivered
was 7.86 plus or minus 4.32. Twenty (20.2%) subjects dropped out of treatment before it
was completed; of those 20 subjects seven received no treatment. Forty-two
received all 12 sessions. Subjects were more likely to receive the first
five intervention sessions. Less than half received the last three
sessions. Nearly one-third had interventions "doubled up" (two sessions
were delivered during the same call). In one instance a later session was
delivered before an earlier session. The time between sessions ranged from
5.3-11.5 days. Interventions ranged between 10.5-15.4 minutes.
Interventionists contacted subjects more than one time to deliver an
intervention with the number of attempts to contact ranging from 1.7-2.7.
Clearly, the planned protocol was not followed in regard to number of
sessions delivered and length of time between sessions. The intervention
was designed as 12 weekly sessions with each session averaging 15-20
minutes. While the interventionist scheduled a day and time for the next
intervention, instances occurred when the subject was unavailable,
additional attempts to contact were made, and the intervention was missed
or "doubled up" at the next session. A 12 week intervention is possibly
too long; some sessions may be unnecessary, particularly for all
individuals. Sessions may need to be individualized according to a
person's needs and life situation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementing a Medication Adherence Intervention in Persons with HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160342-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementing a Medication Adherence Intervention in Persons with HIV</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Erlen, Judith, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 440 Victoria Building, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">412-624-1905</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jae001+@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan M. Sereika, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research utilization is not without difficulty. This study examined <br/> the fidelity of a 12 week telephone intervention based on social cognitive <br/> theory designed to enhance medication adherence in persons with HIV <br/> prescribed antiretroviral therapy. This study used the 99 subjects <br/> randomized to intervention from a randomized controlled trial testing the <br/> effectiveness of an adherence intervention over time (1R01 NR04749). The <br/> sample included 66 males (66.7%). Slightly more than half (54.5%) were <br/> white. The average age was 39.68 plus or minus.98 years. Subjects completed 13.09 plus or minus 2.30 <br/> years of formal education. The number of intervention sessions delivered <br/> was 7.86 plus or minus 4.32. Twenty (20.2%) subjects dropped out of treatment before it <br/> was completed; of those 20 subjects seven received no treatment. Forty-two <br/> received all 12 sessions. Subjects were more likely to receive the first <br/> five intervention sessions. Less than half received the last three <br/> sessions. Nearly one-third had interventions &quot;doubled up&quot; (two sessions <br/> were delivered during the same call). In one instance a later session was <br/> delivered before an earlier session. The time between sessions ranged from <br/> 5.3-11.5 days. Interventions ranged between 10.5-15.4 minutes. <br/> Interventionists contacted subjects more than one time to deliver an <br/> intervention with the number of attempts to contact ranging from 1.7-2.7. <br/> Clearly, the planned protocol was not followed in regard to number of <br/> sessions delivered and length of time between sessions. The intervention <br/> was designed as 12 weekly sessions with each session averaging 15-20 <br/> minutes. While the interventionist scheduled a day and time for the next <br/> intervention, instances occurred when the subject was unavailable, <br/> additional attempts to contact were made, and the intervention was missed <br/> or &quot;doubled up&quot; at the next session. A 12 week intervention is possibly <br/> too long; some sessions may be unnecessary, particularly for all <br/> individuals. Sessions may need to be individualized according to a <br/> person's needs and life situation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.