Sociocultural Perspective on Organ and Tissue Donation Among Oglala Lakota Indians

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160343
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sociocultural Perspective on Organ and Tissue Donation Among Oglala Lakota Indians
Abstract:
Sociocultural Perspective on Organ and Tissue Donation Among Oglala Lakota Indians
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Fahrenwald, Nancy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA
Contact Telephone:605-688-4098
Co-Authors:Wendy S. Stabnow
For American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN, there is a dire need
for kidney transplantation as a consequence of the pervasiveness of type 2
diabetes. Unfortunately, there are few AI/AN donors each year. The purpose
of this study was to discover the sociocultural patterns that influence
intentions and decisions about organ and tissue donation among American
Indian adults. The qualitative ethnographic study used a social-ecological
framework derived from the discipline of public health. The snowball
sample included 21 Oglala Lakota Sioux adult men and women (age >19
years). Person to person interviews were conducted using structured
open-ended questions derived from the organ donation literature and from
the social-ecological framework. Interviews were audiotape and
professionally transcribed. Data were categorized into construct codes
using analysis of emerging themes. The themes that emerged from the
analysis included uncertain knowledge, the diabetes crisis, cultural
transitions, health care system competence, and outreach efforts.
Participants knew very little about the organ and tissue donation process.
There was a basic understanding of donor and recipient compatibility.
Testimony that diabetes is contributing to a dire need for kidney donors
among Indian people was pervasive. Participants knew people who were on
dialysis or who were waiting for a kidney donor. Traditional beliefs about
entering the spirit world with an intact body were cited. Bridging
traditional beliefs and values with the diabetes crisis was viewed as
essential. Participant trust in the health care system and the readiness
of the IHS hospitals for organ and tissue donation was a concern.
Culturally-competent educational outreach programs tailored to the
reservation community need to include system change in leaders, health
care provider competence, use of community stories and respect for family
communication.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSociocultural Perspective on Organ and Tissue Donation Among Oglala Lakota Indiansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160343-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sociocultural Perspective on Organ and Tissue Donation Among Oglala Lakota Indians</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fahrenwald, Nancy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">605-688-4098</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nancy.Fahrenwald@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wendy S. Stabnow</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">For American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN, there is a dire need <br/> for kidney transplantation as a consequence of the pervasiveness of type 2 <br/> diabetes. Unfortunately, there are few AI/AN donors each year. The purpose <br/> of this study was to discover the sociocultural patterns that influence <br/> intentions and decisions about organ and tissue donation among American <br/> Indian adults. The qualitative ethnographic study used a social-ecological <br/> framework derived from the discipline of public health. The snowball <br/> sample included 21 Oglala Lakota Sioux adult men and women (age &gt;19 <br/> years). Person to person interviews were conducted using structured <br/> open-ended questions derived from the organ donation literature and from <br/> the social-ecological framework. Interviews were audiotape and <br/> professionally transcribed. Data were categorized into construct codes <br/> using analysis of emerging themes. The themes that emerged from the <br/> analysis included uncertain knowledge, the diabetes crisis, cultural <br/> transitions, health care system competence, and outreach efforts. <br/> Participants knew very little about the organ and tissue donation process. <br/> There was a basic understanding of donor and recipient compatibility. <br/> Testimony that diabetes is contributing to a dire need for kidney donors <br/> among Indian people was pervasive. Participants knew people who were on <br/> dialysis or who were waiting for a kidney donor. Traditional beliefs about <br/> entering the spirit world with an intact body were cited. Bridging <br/> traditional beliefs and values with the diabetes crisis was viewed as <br/> essential. Participant trust in the health care system and the readiness <br/> of the IHS hospitals for organ and tissue donation was a concern. <br/> Culturally-competent educational outreach programs tailored to the <br/> reservation community need to include system change in leaders, health <br/> care provider competence, use of community stories and respect for family <br/> communication.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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