2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160346
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A New Approach to Synthesis of Lifespan Research
Abstract:
A New Approach to Synthesis of Lifespan Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Floyd, Judith, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.4135
Co-Authors:James J. Janisse, PhD, Assistant Professor; Elizabeth Jenuwine, PhD, MLIS, Research Assistant; and Joel W. Ager, PhD, Biostatistician
Dependable knowledge about the magnitude of sleep change with age
became increasingly more important over the past decade as sleep
clinicians including nurses began to question the reliability of
previously accepted norms for adult sleep. Purpose. The purpose of this
study was to describe linear and non-linear changes in sleep over the
adult lifespan. Theoretical Framework. A mid-range theory of lifespan
development underpinned this research. Sample. 587 studies of sleep and
age were included in the research synthesis. Intercoder reliability
exceeded the cutoff for excellent (Kappa=.75). Methods. A new research
synthesis method developed by the investigators was used to estimate both
linear and non-linear components of aging-related sleep change over the
adult lifespan. The method consisted of generating scatterplots of
hypothetical data points based on the means and standard deviations
reported for groups of similarly-aged healthy subjects. Once scatterplots
were generated, Cubic B smoothing splines were fitted to the data. They
were inspected to determine the kind of function that best fit the data.
Results. Functions could be identified as linear, quadratic, or
linear-quadratic for 14 sleep variables. Slopes were used to describe
age-related change in sleep variables with linear functions, minimum
points were identified for quadratic functions, and ages at which the rate
of change in sleep accelerated were identified using segmented regression
for linear-quadratic functions. Differences in sleep patterns based on sex
of subjects could be shown for only 4 sleep variables because most
commonly studied sleep variables remain under-studied in women.
Conclusions. This new approach to research synthesis of aging-related
change was effective for describing sleep change over the adult lifespan
and for identifying gaps in the sleep and aging research literature.
Funding. This study was funded by the National Institute of Nursing
Research, grant R01 NR003880, "Aging-Related Sleep Changes: A
Meta-Analysis," 2000-2004.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA New Approach to Synthesis of Lifespan Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160346-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A New Approach to Synthesis of Lifespan Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Floyd, Judith, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.4135</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judith.floyd@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">James J. Janisse, PhD, Assistant Professor; Elizabeth Jenuwine, PhD, MLIS, Research Assistant; and Joel W. Ager, PhD, Biostatistician</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Dependable knowledge about the magnitude of sleep change with age <br/> became increasingly more important over the past decade as sleep <br/> clinicians including nurses began to question the reliability of <br/> previously accepted norms for adult sleep. Purpose. The purpose of this <br/> study was to describe linear and non-linear changes in sleep over the <br/> adult lifespan. Theoretical Framework. A mid-range theory of lifespan <br/> development underpinned this research. Sample. 587 studies of sleep and <br/> age were included in the research synthesis. Intercoder reliability <br/> exceeded the cutoff for excellent (Kappa=.75). Methods. A new research <br/> synthesis method developed by the investigators was used to estimate both <br/> linear and non-linear components of aging-related sleep change over the <br/> adult lifespan. The method consisted of generating scatterplots of <br/> hypothetical data points based on the means and standard deviations <br/> reported for groups of similarly-aged healthy subjects. Once scatterplots <br/> were generated, Cubic B smoothing splines were fitted to the data. They <br/> were inspected to determine the kind of function that best fit the data. <br/> Results. Functions could be identified as linear, quadratic, or <br/> linear-quadratic for 14 sleep variables. Slopes were used to describe <br/> age-related change in sleep variables with linear functions, minimum <br/> points were identified for quadratic functions, and ages at which the rate <br/> of change in sleep accelerated were identified using segmented regression <br/> for linear-quadratic functions. Differences in sleep patterns based on sex <br/> of subjects could be shown for only 4 sleep variables because most <br/> commonly studied sleep variables remain under-studied in women. <br/> Conclusions. This new approach to research synthesis of aging-related <br/> change was effective for describing sleep change over the adult lifespan <br/> and for identifying gaps in the sleep and aging research literature. <br/> Funding. This study was funded by the National Institute of Nursing <br/> Research, grant R01 NR003880, &quot;Aging-Related Sleep Changes: A <br/> Meta-Analysis,&quot; 2000-2004.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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