Facilitators and Barriers to Managing Childhood Asthma on a Midwest Ojibwe Reservation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160347
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Facilitators and Barriers to Managing Childhood Asthma on a Midwest Ojibwe Reservation
Abstract:
Facilitators and Barriers to Managing Childhood Asthma on a Midwest Ojibwe Reservation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Garwick, Ann, PhD, FAAN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612 624 1141
Co-Authors:Jacqueline Gustafson, MSN, PNP, RN, Nurse Practitioner, Mindy Langer, MSN, PNP, RN, Nurse Practitioner, Melissa Hinote, MSN, PNP, RN, Nurse Practitioner
This paper aims to identify the range and type of facilitators and
barriers to effective management of childhood asthma from the standpoint
of rural Ojibwe family caregivers who live on a Midwest reservation.
BronfenbrennerÆs ecological model was used to identify facilitators and
barriers from a systems perspective. A subset of nine rural, Ojibwe
primary family caregivers who have school-aged children with asthma were
drawn from the Indian Family Stories Project. This community based
research project was developed in collaboration with families, community
leaders, and providers using a participatory action research approach. A
Native project coordinator conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews
that focused on the familyÆs cultural background and their experiences
caring for their child with asthma in the context of the community.
Content analytic strategies were used to identify and categorize
facilitators and barriers to asthma management at home, school, and in the
community. A broad range of types of barriers (n=47) and facilitators
(n=61) were identified. Seven main categories of facilitators were
identified: family systems, asthma related resources, health care systems
and providers, traditional healing, tribal government, school systems, and
environment. Seven main categories of barriers were identified: health
care system and providers, asthma related factors, environmental, family,
school, socioeconomic, and work. The facilitators reflect the cultural
strengths and strong family and community support network that rural
Ojibwe family caregivers drew on to help them manage childhood asthma.
However, the broad range of barriers indicates the myriad challenges that
participants faced in managing their child's asthma. Implications for
nursing practice include: assess the facilitators and barriers that
families face in managing asthma; ensure that the child has adults at
home, school and the community who are knowledgeable about asthma
management; target interventions to reduce family-identified barriers and
enhance support networks; and deliver culturally appropriate asthma
education and resources that address family-identified needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFacilitators and Barriers to Managing Childhood Asthma on a Midwest Ojibwe Reservationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160347-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Facilitators and Barriers to Managing Childhood Asthma on a Midwest Ojibwe Reservation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garwick, Ann, PhD, FAAN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612 624 1141</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">garwi001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacqueline Gustafson, MSN, PNP, RN, Nurse Practitioner, Mindy Langer, MSN, PNP, RN, Nurse Practitioner, Melissa Hinote, MSN, PNP, RN, Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This paper aims to identify the range and type of facilitators and <br/> barriers to effective management of childhood asthma from the standpoint <br/> of rural Ojibwe family caregivers who live on a Midwest reservation. <br/> Bronfenbrenner&AElig;s ecological model was used to identify facilitators and <br/> barriers from a systems perspective. A subset of nine rural, Ojibwe <br/> primary family caregivers who have school-aged children with asthma were <br/> drawn from the Indian Family Stories Project. This community based <br/> research project was developed in collaboration with families, community <br/> leaders, and providers using a participatory action research approach. A <br/> Native project coordinator conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews <br/> that focused on the family&AElig;s cultural background and their experiences <br/> caring for their child with asthma in the context of the community. <br/> Content analytic strategies were used to identify and categorize <br/> facilitators and barriers to asthma management at home, school, and in the <br/> community. A broad range of types of barriers (n=47) and facilitators <br/> (n=61) were identified. Seven main categories of facilitators were <br/> identified: family systems, asthma related resources, health care systems <br/> and providers, traditional healing, tribal government, school systems, and <br/> environment. Seven main categories of barriers were identified: health <br/> care system and providers, asthma related factors, environmental, family, <br/> school, socioeconomic, and work. The facilitators reflect the cultural <br/> strengths and strong family and community support network that rural <br/> Ojibwe family caregivers drew on to help them manage childhood asthma. <br/> However, the broad range of barriers indicates the myriad challenges that <br/> participants faced in managing their child's asthma. Implications for <br/> nursing practice include: assess the facilitators and barriers that <br/> families face in managing asthma; ensure that the child has adults at <br/> home, school and the community who are knowledgeable about asthma <br/> management; target interventions to reduce family-identified barriers and <br/> enhance support networks; and deliver culturally appropriate asthma <br/> education and resources that address family-identified needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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