2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160348
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preoperative Physical Activity of Abdominal Surgery Patients
Abstract:
Preoperative Physical Activity of Abdominal Surgery Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Good, Marion, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5975
Co-Authors:Xiaomei Cong, PhDc, RN, Project Director
Physical activity (PA) before surgery has not been measured, but
should be considered for control in studies of postoperative immunity. The
purpose was to describe preoperative PA in abdominal surgery patients in a
preliminary analysis of 359 adults (71% female), 19-75 years, at a
tertiary hospital. The Seven-day Activity Recall (Blair et al, 1995) was
used to measure the dependent variables, type, amount, and intensity of
energy expenditure during seven days before surgery. Subjects were asked
to recall the number of hours spent sleeping [1 metabolic equivalent
(MET)] and engaged in moderate (3.0-5.0 METs), hard (5.1-6.9 METs), and
very hard (> 7 METs) activity during the week before surgery. Intensity of
PA was reported as MET minutes/day (which can also be expressed as
kcal/day). Men had significantly more hours (.43 vs. .04 hours) and
greater energy expenditure (160.13 vs. 15.44 MET minutes/day) in hard
activity than women before the surgery, p<.05. The most frequent
activities for men were walking (59%), and mowing lawn (17%); for women
they were household tasks (68%) and walking (38%). Total preoperative PA
was significantly related to older age, chronic pain, diabetes, and
cancer, r=.11-.16, conditions in which less activity is expected, thus
supporting construct validity, p<.05. Greater energy expenditure in
moderate activity before surgery was associated with more post-operative
activity, r=.13-.24, and earlier discharge, r=.17, p<.05. Compared to a
study of younger healthy individuals (Richardson, et al. 2001), people
preparing for surgery had less sleep (6.6 vs. 7.1-7.4 hours), more
MET minutes/day expended in moderate activity (389-474 vs. 124-177) and
less in hard (58 vs 87) and very hard activity (51 vs 93). PA has been
studied in cardiac and obese populations. This initial preoperative study
indicates that people moderated their activity to prepare for their
absence from home and according to their age and health state.
Funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreoperative Physical Activity of Abdominal Surgery Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160348-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preoperative Physical Activity of Abdominal Surgery Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Good, Marion, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5975</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mpg@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Xiaomei Cong, PhDc, RN, Project Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Physical activity (PA) before surgery has not been measured, but <br/> should be considered for control in studies of postoperative immunity. The <br/> purpose was to describe preoperative PA in abdominal surgery patients in a <br/> preliminary analysis of 359 adults (71% female), 19-75 years, at a <br/> tertiary hospital. The Seven-day Activity Recall (Blair et al, 1995) was <br/> used to measure the dependent variables, type, amount, and intensity of <br/> energy expenditure during seven days before surgery. Subjects were asked <br/> to recall the number of hours spent sleeping [1 metabolic equivalent <br/> (MET)] and engaged in moderate (3.0-5.0 METs), hard (5.1-6.9 METs), and <br/> very hard (&gt; 7 METs) activity during the week before surgery. Intensity of <br/> PA was reported as MET minutes/day (which can also be expressed as <br/> kcal/day). Men had significantly more hours (.43 vs. .04 hours) and <br/> greater energy expenditure (160.13 vs. 15.44 MET minutes/day) in hard <br/> activity than women before the surgery, p&lt;.05. The most frequent <br/> activities for men were walking (59%), and mowing lawn (17%); for women <br/> they were household tasks (68%) and walking (38%). Total preoperative PA <br/> was significantly related to older age, chronic pain, diabetes, and <br/> cancer, r=.11-.16, conditions in which less activity is expected, thus <br/> supporting construct validity, p&lt;.05. Greater energy expenditure in <br/> moderate activity before surgery was associated with more post-operative <br/> activity, r=.13-.24, and earlier discharge, r=.17, p&lt;.05. Compared to a <br/> study of younger healthy individuals (Richardson, et al. 2001), people <br/> preparing for surgery had less sleep (6.6 vs. 7.1-7.4 hours), more <br/> MET minutes/day expended in moderate activity (389-474 vs. 124-177) and <br/> less in hard (58 vs 87) and very hard activity (51 vs 93). PA has been <br/> studied in cardiac and obese populations. This initial preoperative study <br/> indicates that people moderated their activity to prepare for their <br/> absence from home and according to their age and health state.<br/> Funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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