2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160350
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moral Distress in the Long-Term Care Setting
Abstract:
Moral Distress in the Long-Term Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Green, Amy, Co-Presenter and Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790, USA
Contact Telephone:309-438-2349
Co-Authors:Brenda Recchia Jeffers, Graduate Program Director and Co-Presenter
The experience of moral distress in nurses has been researched primarily in acute care settings. Little research has been done investigating moral distress in nurses working in long-term care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the experience of moral distress in a sample of registered nurses working in a long-term care facility. Using semi-structured interviews, a series of open-ended questions were used to gather information. Five clinical nurses and one administrator were interviewed. Interviews were audio-taped for accuracy in transcription. Audio-taped interviews were transcribed and major themes identified. All of the nurses interviewed acknowledged that they had experienced moral distress. While most nurses reported negative effects from moral distress, many nurses reported positive outcomes from the experience. Overall nurses felt their moral distress did not impact the quality of care delivered to nursing home residents. Nurses in this study related that even though they had experienced moral distress, there were many structures present within the nursing home to help them manage their distress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoral Distress in the Long-Term Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160350-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Moral Distress in the Long-Term Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Green, Amy, Co-Presenter and Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-438-2349</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aegreen@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Brenda Recchia Jeffers, Graduate Program Director and Co-Presenter</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The experience of moral distress in nurses has been researched primarily in acute care settings. Little research has been done investigating moral distress in nurses working in long-term care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the experience of moral distress in a sample of registered nurses working in a long-term care facility. Using semi-structured interviews, a series of open-ended questions were used to gather information. Five clinical nurses and one administrator were interviewed. Interviews were audio-taped for accuracy in transcription. Audio-taped interviews were transcribed and major themes identified. All of the nurses interviewed acknowledged that they had experienced moral distress. While most nurses reported negative effects from moral distress, many nurses reported positive outcomes from the experience. Overall nurses felt their moral distress did not impact the quality of care delivered to nursing home residents. Nurses in this study related that even though they had experienced moral distress, there were many structures present within the nursing home to help them manage their distress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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