2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160352
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Research: From Efficacy to Translation
Abstract:
Clinical Research: From Efficacy to Translation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Grey, Margaret, DrPH, CPNP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Independence Foundation Professor of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Research Affairs, New Haven, CT, USA
Pregnancy is associated with mood alterations, especially depression.
Questions remain about differences in mood between pregnant women and
nonpregnant women of childbearing age.
The purpose of this study-in-progress is to determine whether feelings of
psychological distress and/or well-being differ among self-classified low
and high-risk expectant women and nonpregnant women of childbearing age.
Lazarus and Folkman's (1984) Stress, Appraisal, and Coping theory guides
this exploratory study using a nonexperimental, correlational, survey
design. Following human subjects guidelines, data was collected from a
convenience sample of 168 adult women from a women's health outpatient
center. Tools included the Stewart, Ware, Sherbourne, and Wells' (1991)
Medical Outcomes Study Psychological Distress/Well-Being Battery,
CES-Depression scale (Radloff, 1977), Risk Assessment Form (Gray, 2001)
and a demographic form.
Data is currently being prepared for analysis using SPSS 11. Demographic
variables will be summarized using appropriate descriptive statistics.
Subtotals and Cronbach alphas will be calculated as required. Hypothesis
testing is set for alpha=.05. One-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc
comparisons will examine differences among total subscale scores on the
MOS with women categorized as either high-risk, low-risk, or nonpregnant.
Additionally, group item response patterns for each item on the CES-D will
be examined using one-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc comparisons with women
categorized as either high-risk, low-risk, or nonpregnant. Items with
significant differences between groups will then be subjected to factor
and/or discriminant function analysis to investigate group profiles.
Knowledge of typical differences in depression response patterns among
women of childbearing age and those facing the additional challenges of
low or high-risk pregnancy can assist nurses to make more rapid, targeted
assessments during busy outpatient visits.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Research: From Efficacy to Translationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160352-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical Research: From Efficacy to Translation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grey, Margaret, DrPH, CPNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Independence Foundation Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Research Affairs, New Haven, CT, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skittredge@resourcenter.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pregnancy is associated with mood alterations, especially depression. <br/> Questions remain about differences in mood between pregnant women and <br/> nonpregnant women of childbearing age. <br/> The purpose of this study-in-progress is to determine whether feelings of <br/> psychological distress and/or well-being differ among self-classified low <br/> and high-risk expectant women and nonpregnant women of childbearing age.<br/> Lazarus and Folkman's (1984) Stress, Appraisal, and Coping theory guides <br/> this exploratory study using a nonexperimental, correlational, survey <br/> design. Following human subjects guidelines, data was collected from a <br/> convenience sample of 168 adult women from a women's health outpatient <br/> center. Tools included the Stewart, Ware, Sherbourne, and Wells' (1991) <br/> Medical Outcomes Study Psychological Distress/Well-Being Battery, <br/> CES-Depression scale (Radloff, 1977), Risk Assessment Form (Gray, 2001) <br/> and a demographic form.<br/> Data is currently being prepared for analysis using SPSS 11. Demographic <br/> variables will be summarized using appropriate descriptive statistics. <br/> Subtotals and Cronbach alphas will be calculated as required. Hypothesis <br/> testing is set for alpha=.05. One-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc <br/> comparisons will examine differences among total subscale scores on the <br/> MOS with women categorized as either high-risk, low-risk, or nonpregnant. <br/> Additionally, group item response patterns for each item on the CES-D will <br/> be examined using one-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc comparisons with women <br/> categorized as either high-risk, low-risk, or nonpregnant. Items with <br/> significant differences between groups will then be subjected to factor <br/> and/or discriminant function analysis to investigate group profiles.<br/> Knowledge of typical differences in depression response patterns among <br/> women of childbearing age and those facing the additional challenges of <br/> low or high-risk pregnancy can assist nurses to make more rapid, targeted <br/> assessments during busy outpatient visits.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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