2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160353
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain and analgesic use in 3-7 years children after tonsillectomy
Abstract:
Pain and analgesic use in 3-7 years children after tonsillectomy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Helgadottir, Helga, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Pre-doctoral Fellowx
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-7457
Co-Authors: Margaret E. Wilson, PhD, MN, BSN, Associate Professor
Tonsillectomy is a common surgical procedure usually associated with
moderate to severe pain. Several researchers have found inadequate pain
management in children at home after tonsillectomy in a day surgery
setting. The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of pain
intensity and analgesic administration in 3-7 year old children undergoing
tonsillectomy during the operative day in the hospital and the first two
postoperative days at home. Conceptual framework: The framework for the
study is based on the assessment and therapeutic interventions components
of the Nursing Pain Management Model (Broome & Huth, 2003).
Method/participants: In this descriptive study, 68 children undergoing
elective tonsillectomy were taught to use the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Pain
intensity scores and data about administration of analgesics were
collected from the children, the chart, and parents. Data were collected
over 3 days. Results: Children received primarily acetaminophen or
acetaminophen with codeine in the hospital. At home, 99% of doses
administered were acetaminophen only. Most doses were administered
rectally. Forty percent of children received 24-hour therapeutic doses in
the hospital. Only 10% received a 24-hour therapeutic dose at home in
spite of significant pain scores of four or five persisting through the
second postoperative day. Younger children were less likely to receive
acetaminophen with codeine. In the hospital, children with pain intensity
scores of four or five received prescribed morphine only 13% of the time.
Conclusions: Children experienced clinically significant pain through the
second postoperative day that was not adequately managed by nurses and
parents. The large number of children with scores of four or five
demonstrates inadequate analgesia through at least the second
postoperative day and will probably require a change in protocol to
provide more aggressive pain management earlier. This study extends to
younger children the research evidence that current pain protocols are
inadequate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain and analgesic use in 3-7 years children after tonsillectomyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160353-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain and analgesic use in 3-7 years children after tonsillectomy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Helgadottir, Helga, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pre-doctoral Fellowx</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-7457</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hhelgado@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value"> Margaret E. Wilson, PhD, MN, BSN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Tonsillectomy is a common surgical procedure usually associated with <br/> moderate to severe pain. Several researchers have found inadequate pain <br/> management in children at home after tonsillectomy in a day surgery <br/> setting. The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of pain <br/> intensity and analgesic administration in 3-7 year old children undergoing <br/> tonsillectomy during the operative day in the hospital and the first two <br/> postoperative days at home. Conceptual framework: The framework for the <br/> study is based on the assessment and therapeutic interventions components <br/> of the Nursing Pain Management Model (Broome &amp; Huth, 2003). <br/> Method/participants: In this descriptive study, 68 children undergoing <br/> elective tonsillectomy were taught to use the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Pain <br/> intensity scores and data about administration of analgesics were <br/> collected from the children, the chart, and parents. Data were collected <br/> over 3 days. Results: Children received primarily acetaminophen or <br/> acetaminophen with codeine in the hospital. At home, 99% of doses <br/> administered were acetaminophen only. Most doses were administered <br/> rectally. Forty percent of children received 24-hour therapeutic doses in <br/> the hospital. Only 10% received a 24-hour therapeutic dose at home in <br/> spite of significant pain scores of four or five persisting through the <br/> second postoperative day. Younger children were less likely to receive <br/> acetaminophen with codeine. In the hospital, children with pain intensity <br/> scores of four or five received prescribed morphine only 13% of the time. <br/> Conclusions: Children experienced clinically significant pain through the <br/> second postoperative day that was not adequately managed by nurses and <br/> parents. The large number of children with scores of four or five <br/> demonstrates inadequate analgesia through at least the second <br/> postoperative day and will probably require a change in protocol to <br/> provide more aggressive pain management earlier. This study extends to <br/> younger children the research evidence that current pain protocols are <br/> inadequate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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