Longitudinal change in knowledge, behaviors, and health status of community nursing center clients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160356
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Longitudinal change in knowledge, behaviors, and health status of community nursing center clients
Abstract:
Longitudinal change in knowledge, behaviors, and health status of community nursing center clients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hildebrandt, Eugenie, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229-5464
Co-Authors:Mary Jo Baisch, MSc, CNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist: Sally P. Lundeen, FAAN, RN, Dean: Jean Bell-Calvin, MSc, CNS, Clinical Director; and Sheryl Kelber, MS
Academic community nursing centers (CNCs) provide leadership in
clinical research, and research utilization, with a goal of translating
research to evidence-based practice. In this presentation we share outcome
data from a longitudinal study conducted at an academic CNC that has
provided access to nursing care for vulnerable populations for over 15
years. There are limited data about nursing interventions and outcomes in
community settings, and limited access to sophisticated computer analysis
of such data. The conceptual framework was the Lundeen Community Nursing
Center Model which reflects community-based, comprehensive, collaborative,
coordinated, and culturally competent care. The setting was a CNC located
in the Neighborhood Center of a large federally subsidized housing
development; the sample was a subset of 949 clients of the CNC. The design
of the study was a retrospective review of client record data from 1989 to
2000. The instrument was the Omaha System, a nursing taxonomy developed to
code client problems, clinical interventions and client outcomes. All
client computerized record data were reviewed retrospectively for those
clients who were seen at least 6 times within the study period. This
represented approximately 30% of all clients seen at the center during
that time (N=949). Nursing interventions and change over time were
identified and tracked for client knowledge, health behaviors, and health
status (KBS) related to frequently seen health concerns of the clients.
Analysis was facilitated using the Automated Community Health Information
System (ACHIS), a relational data management system, and SPSS PC for
Windows V12.0.2 (R). Results illustrate a positive change in KBS in these
nurse-managed clients. The description of client problems, nursing
interventions and the translation of findings into practice were
facilitated through the use of the relational database. Conclusions and
implications for practice: Community based advanced practice nursing
interventions have a significant effect on client health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLongitudinal change in knowledge, behaviors, and health status of community nursing center clientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160356-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Longitudinal change in knowledge, behaviors, and health status of community nursing center clients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hildebrandt, Eugenie, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229-5464</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hbrandt@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Jo Baisch, MSc, CNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist: Sally P. Lundeen, FAAN, RN, Dean: Jean Bell-Calvin, MSc, CNS, Clinical Director; and Sheryl Kelber, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Academic community nursing centers (CNCs) provide leadership in <br/> clinical research, and research utilization, with a goal of translating <br/> research to evidence-based practice. In this presentation we share outcome <br/> data from a longitudinal study conducted at an academic CNC that has <br/> provided access to nursing care for vulnerable populations for over 15 <br/> years. There are limited data about nursing interventions and outcomes in <br/> community settings, and limited access to sophisticated computer analysis <br/> of such data. The conceptual framework was the Lundeen Community Nursing <br/> Center Model which reflects community-based, comprehensive, collaborative, <br/> coordinated, and culturally competent care. The setting was a CNC located <br/> in the Neighborhood Center of a large federally subsidized housing <br/> development; the sample was a subset of 949 clients of the CNC. The design <br/> of the study was a retrospective review of client record data from 1989 to <br/> 2000. The instrument was the Omaha System, a nursing taxonomy developed to <br/> code client problems, clinical interventions and client outcomes. All <br/> client computerized record data were reviewed retrospectively for those <br/> clients who were seen at least 6 times within the study period. This <br/> represented approximately 30% of all clients seen at the center during <br/> that time (N=949). Nursing interventions and change over time were <br/> identified and tracked for client knowledge, health behaviors, and health <br/> status (KBS) related to frequently seen health concerns of the clients. <br/> Analysis was facilitated using the Automated Community Health Information <br/> System (ACHIS), a relational data management system, and SPSS PC for <br/> Windows V12.0.2 (R). Results illustrate a positive change in KBS in these <br/> nurse-managed clients. The description of client problems, nursing <br/> interventions and the translation of findings into practice were <br/> facilitated through the use of the relational database. Conclusions and <br/> implications for practice: Community based advanced practice nursing <br/> interventions have a significant effect on client health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:51:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:51:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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